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Published: Oct. 28, 2016 at 12:12 p.m.

Top 10 scariest players in college football

Halloween brings out one of the strongest of the human emotions: fear. As a species, we've learned to turn that fear into a fight-or-flight reflex to survive. You could, therefore, say football is the most human of all professional sports since quarterbacks and other ball carriers are constantly using their instincts to fight off or run away from tacklers.

In honor of the holiday, which will be celebrated across the country this weekend, here are 10 players that put fear into the hearts and minds of their opponents.

10 Photos Total

  • Some might think that Anderson's teammate and fellow senior linebacker, Tim Williams, is a scarier player because of his ability to come off the edge, but I think SEC coaches would tell you they fear Anderson's game even more. Why? Because he's always in the right place. Anderson leads the team with 11.5 tackles for loss, mostly because he stays home on containment and is strong enough to disengage from blockers to make plays. His relentless hustle also makes him a nightmare for ball carriers that are trying to reach the sideline. Sometimes the long, drawn-out anticipation of a scare is more impactful than the quick surprise. 10

    Matthew Visinsky/Associated Press

    10. Ryan Anderson, LB, Alabama

    Some might think that Anderson's teammate and fellow senior linebacker, Tim Williams, is a scarier player because of his ability to come off the edge, but I think SEC coaches would tell you they fear Anderson's game even more. Why? Because he's always in the right place. Anderson leads the team with 11.5 tackles for loss, mostly because he stays home on containment and is strong enough to disengage from blockers to make plays. His relentless hustle also makes him a nightmare for ball carriers that are trying to reach the sideline. Sometimes the long, drawn-out anticipation of a scare is more impactful than the quick surprise.

  • If you're Indiana's opposition, Feeney flat-out doesn't like you. He's determined not to let his man be the one to make the tackle. His strength, mobility and willingness to sell out on every cut block make him an elite prospect at the position -- and a nightmare for defenders. 9

    Indiana University Athletics

    9. Dan Feeney, OG, Indiana

    If you're Indiana's opposition, Feeney flat-out doesn't like you. He's determined not to let his man be the one to make the tackle. His strength, mobility and willingness to sell out on every cut block make him an elite prospect at the position -- and a nightmare for defenders.

  • It's pretty simple: If you have the ball, Luani's coming for you. He'll throw his body into ball carriers in the open field when going low to secure a stop, and he'll stop a back in the hole if needed. Luani plays with no fear in the back half, as well, making receivers pay with a pop for daring to attempt to catch a pass. The Hebrew word "shalom" means "peace", but Luani's play brings anything but peace to opposing players and coaches. 8

    Young Kwak/Associated Press

    8. Shalom Luani, S, Washington State

    It's pretty simple: If you have the ball, Luani's coming for you. He'll throw his body into ball carriers in the open field when going low to secure a stop, and he'll stop a back in the hole if needed. Luani plays with no fear in the back half, as well, making receivers pay with a pop for daring to attempt to catch a pass. The Hebrew word "shalom" means "peace", but Luani's play brings anything but peace to opposing players and coaches.

  • One look at this mountain of a man makes opponents skittish when lining up against him. The 6-foot-8, 340-pound son of the late NFL tackle <a href="http://www.nfl.com/player/orlandobrown/2499861/profile">Orlando "Zeus" Brown</a> is intimidating. He's a force to be reckoned with due to his pure size and length. He has the agility to hold off quicker, crafty pass rushers. Brown is a one-man eclipse that pushes defensive coaches to change their alignments to keep their best pass rushers away from his side. 7

    Tony Gutierrez/Associated Press

    7. Orlando Brown, OT, Oklahoma

    One look at this mountain of a man makes opponents skittish when lining up against him. The 6-foot-8, 340-pound son of the late NFL tackle Orlando "Zeus" Brown is intimidating. He's a force to be reckoned with due to his pure size and length. He has the agility to hold off quicker, crafty pass rushers. Brown is a one-man eclipse that pushes defensive coaches to change their alignments to keep their best pass rushers away from his side.

  • The best advice for a ball carrier when Evans is coming downhill toward him: Duck and cover. Evans has no issues putting his shoulder into a running back's chest to stop the runner's momentum, and maybe even knock the ball loose. Receivers coming into his area on the sideline or over the middle must also keep their head on a swivel. 6

    David J. Phillip/Associated Press

    6. Justin Evans, S, Texas A&M

    The best advice for a ball carrier when Evans is coming downhill toward him: Duck and cover. Evans has no issues putting his shoulder into a running back's chest to stop the runner's momentum, and maybe even knock the ball loose. Receivers coming into his area on the sideline or over the middle must also keep their head on a swivel.

  • You know how ghosts in movies sometimes seem to be in a lot of different places at once? That's what facing Peppers must feel like because he plays offense, defense and special teams for the Wolverines. On defense, he can rush the passer, play the run, back into coverage and even attack pulling guards to free up his teammates. And all hands better be on deck when Peppers gets the ball as a runner or returner. He's everywhere. 5

    Tony Ding/Associated Press

    5. Jabrill Peppers, S/LB/RS/RB, Michigan

    You know how ghosts in movies sometimes seem to be in a lot of different places at once? That's what facing Peppers must feel like because he plays offense, defense and special teams for the Wolverines. On defense, he can rush the passer, play the run, back into coverage and even attack pulling guards to free up his teammates. And all hands better be on deck when Peppers gets the ball as a runner or returner. He's everywhere.

  • If you want to know how scary Allen can be, ask the interior of Texas A&M's offensive line. He rag-dolled guards and centers on demand to attack the quarterback throughout <a href="http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000727371/article/grading-the-big-5-week-8-grade-for-alabama-dl-jonathan-allen">the Tide's victory over the Aggies last week</a>, coming off the ball hard and using his very strong hands to toss them aside. Allen has the strength to impose his will on those in his way. His agility and quickness belie his size (6-foot-3, 291 pounds, per school measurements). 4

    Matthew Visinsky/Associated Press

    4. Jonathan Allen, DL, Alabama

    If you want to know how scary Allen can be, ask the interior of Texas A&M's offensive line. He rag-dolled guards and centers on demand to attack the quarterback throughout the Tide's victory over the Aggies last week, coming off the ball hard and using his very strong hands to toss them aside. Allen has the strength to impose his will on those in his way. His agility and quickness belie his size (6-foot-3, 291 pounds, per school measurements).

  • It didn't take too long for Fournette to remind Ole Miss (and everyone else) how explosive he is when healthy. He's struggled through an ankle injury this season, missing three games, but he <a href="http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000727390/article/grading-the-big-5-week-8-grade-for-lsu-rb-leonard-fournette">exploded last week against the Rebels</a>, setting a school record with 284 rushing yards and scoring three times (twice on runs of 75-plus yards). Fournette trucked defenders when given the chance, looking like the liquid-metal robot T-1000 driving a semi toward Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator 2: Judgement Day. But his speed was just as amazing, as he took away defenders' angles on those long runs to get into the end zone. 3

    Butch Dill/Associated Press

    3. Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU

    It didn't take too long for Fournette to remind Ole Miss (and everyone else) how explosive he is when healthy. He's struggled through an ankle injury this season, missing three games, but he exploded last week against the Rebels, setting a school record with 284 rushing yards and scoring three times (twice on runs of 75-plus yards). Fournette trucked defenders when given the chance, looking like the liquid-metal robot T-1000 driving a semi toward Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator 2: Judgement Day. But his speed was just as amazing, as he took away defenders' angles on those long runs to get into the end zone.

  • When Garrett is operating at close to 100 percent, he dominates offensive tackles with his speed off the edge and brute strength. Last weekend, Alabama left tackle Cam Robinson (who could also be on this list) held Garrett at bay as the DE was playing on a bad ankle, but when the Aggies' top defender moved inside, he caused havoc on any play in his area. When he's fully healthy, Garrett will get back to scaring any offensive lineman charged with blocking him. 2

    Sam Craft/Associated Press

    2. Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M

    When Garrett is operating at close to 100 percent, he dominates offensive tackles with his speed off the edge and brute strength. Last weekend, Alabama left tackle Cam Robinson (who could also be on this list) held Garrett at bay as the DE was playing on a bad ankle, but when the Aggies' top defender moved inside, he caused havoc on any play in his area. When he's fully healthy, Garrett will get back to scaring any offensive lineman charged with blocking him.

  • No opposing coach wants to see this right-handed, taller version of Michael Vick on the opposite sideline. There's no doubt that defensive coordinators are living a nightmare as Jackson runs and passes his way his way closer to New York City and the Heisman Trophy ceremony. It's a pick-your-poison situation with Jackson. Keep the linebackers spying on him, and he'll throw darts over the middle to open receivers. Play coverage, and he'll take off for long runs. The scariest part? He's only a sophomore. 1

    Rainier Ehrhardt/Associated Press

    1. Lamar Jackson, QB, Louisville

    No opposing coach wants to see this right-handed, taller version of Michael Vick on the opposite sideline. There's no doubt that defensive coordinators are living a nightmare as Jackson runs and passes his way his way closer to New York City and the Heisman Trophy ceremony. It's a pick-your-poison situation with Jackson. Keep the linebackers spying on him, and he'll throw darts over the middle to open receivers. Play coverage, and he'll take off for long runs. The scariest part? He's only a sophomore.