Around the NFL  

 

Edelman on catch: '70 percent luck, 30 percent skill'

Print
  • By Jeremy Bergman NFL.com
More Columns >

Two days later, it's still hard to believe it actually happened. That the New England Patriots stormed back from 25 points down to win their fifth Super Bowl; that Tom Brady threw for a Super Bowl-record 466 yards and secured his fourth MVP; and that Julian Edelman made that catch.

The Edelman Catch, or Ankle Catch, or Edel-Catch, or (insert clever name here) is still hard to comprehend, just from a physics standpoint, less than 48 hours after the wideout secured the impossible grab on New England's game-tying drive. Even Edelman had to concede that he was not entirely responsible for the miracle snag.

Edelman, flanked by coach Bill Belichick on The Tonight Show, told Jimmy Fallon on Monday that the catch, deflected by numerous Falcons and propped up by an errant leg, was "70 percent luck, 30 percent skill."


Inspired by his coach, Edelman also self-critiqued his route on the play.

"After it all happened, I was kind of disappointed in my route, I'm not going to lie," Edelman said. "I should have stuck it a little harder."

Edelman's grab undoubtedly ranks among the greatest catches in Super Bowl history, if not the most skilled. David Tyree's helmet catch in Super Bowl XLII and Jermaine Kearse's forgotten juggler in Super Bowl XLIX fit into that category, with Tyree's probably taking the cake. Patriots fans will loudly argue otherwise.

When it comes to most skilled catches in Super Bowl history, one doesn't have to look further than the drive prior when Julio Jones caught an impossible toe-tapper, right before the Falcons blew a four-play sequence to fall out of field goal range. And don't forget Santonio Holmes' game-winning touchdown in Super Bowl XLIII.

Skill or no skill, Edelman's catch will be remembered as the definitive play of the 25-point second-half comeback, one littered with clutch conversions and James White scores, but defined by a lucky grab.

Print

Fan Discussion