Ed Oliver

Houston
DT

Prospect Info

College
Houston
Hometown
Class
Houston, TX
Junior
Height
Weight
Arms
6' 2"
287 lbs
31 3/4”
Hands
9 1/4”

Prospect Grade

6.26
Should Become Instant Starter
How We Grade

2019 Draft Results

Drafted by
Buffalo
Bills
Round 1 ‧ Pick 9
40 Yard Dash
--u
Seconds
 
Bench Press
32
Reps
 
Vertical Jump
36.0
INCHES
 
Broad Jump
120.0
INCHES
 
3 Cone Drill
--
Seconds
 
20 Yd Shuttle
--
Seconds
 
60 Yd Shuttle
--
Seconds
 

Playlist

Many people were surprised when Oliver became one of the first five-star recruits to sign with a non-Power Five conference program. The Cougars had signed his brother (Marcus, a two-year starter at right guard) and former high school coach, however, so E.J. (short for Ed Jr.) signed to play near his hometown of Westfield. He was a second-team All-American and top-5 overall recruit who eschewed Alabama to play for UH. He fulfilled his promise quickly, earning first-team All-American and all-conference honors as a true freshman, starting all 13 games and ranking second in the country with 23 tackles for loss, including 3.5 against San Diego State in the Las Vegas Bowl. He also was credited with five sacks among his 66 total tackles, as well as three forced fumbles and nine pass breakups. Oliver won the Outland Trophy and was a finalist for the Nagurski Award as a sophomore, also garnering consensus All-American honors and winning the American Athletic Conference's Defensive Player of the Year Award with 73 tackles, 16.5 for loss, 5.5 sacks, and three pass breakups despite facing constant double-teams. He struggled with a knee injury throughout his junior season and had a televised blow-out with third-year head coach Major Applewhite (who was fired after the season) over whether he should be wearing a heavy jacket on the sideline meant for suited players while nursing that injury. In the end, he started eight games (54 tackles, team-high 14.5 for loss, three sacks, two pass breakups) and earned second-team All-AAC honors and third-team All-American notice from the Associated Press. Oliver's father was a running back at Northwestern State in Louisiana with LSU head coach Ed Orgeron and NFL players Gary Reasons and Mark Duper.
By Lance Zierlein
NFL Analyst
Draft Projection
Round 1
NFL Comparison
Michael Dean Perry
Overview
Twitched-up ball of explosive fury from the moment he comes out of his stance, but his lack of NFL size and length creates challenges with his NFL projection. Oliver's athletic ability is beyond rare, but his ability to add and maintain mass could be the critical for his future success. He creates early advantages but must convert them into early disruption to prevent NFL size from swallowing him. Scheme fit will be critical with shade nose or three-technique as the obvious considerations. If Oliver's frame is maxed out, he might possess the speed, toughness and instincts to transition into an inside linebacker role.
Strengths
  • Elite athlete with high-end foot quickness, agility and fluidity
  • Built low and plays with leverage on his side
  • As twitchy and sudden as any interior lineman you will see
  • Freak-daddy workouts expected for quickness and explosion testing
  • Explodes into blockers with jarring pop for early advantages
  • Instinctive and early play diagnosis
  • Rare initial quickness to disrupt in gaps
  • Posted 53 tackles for loss in just three years
  • Direct, inside hands and plays under opponent's pads
  • Linebacker speed for extended range to tackle
  • Plays with consistent motor and overall hustle
  • Works to half-man in his rush
  • Tilts blocker with jab step before hitting slap-rip counter to opposite edge
  • Body control for efficient, edge to edge counters
  • Pairs spin counter with athletic ability to eat as secondary rusher
Weaknesses
  • Squatty, unimposing frame falls below NFL size norms inside
  • Scouts say he played under 280 pounds
  • Lacks functional length
  • Gets mauled by down blocks and double teams
  • Struggles at times when offenses run downhill at him
  • Gets clogged up against wide-bodies
  • Unable to sustain early jolts into extended power
  • Backdoors blocks in lateral pursuit rather than winning across the face
  • Forced to work excessively at disengaging from blocks
  • Failed to convert explosiveness into impressive sack totals
  • Rush attack is more predictable than diverse

News

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GRADE
9.00-10
Once-in-lifetime player
8.00-8.99
Perennial All-Pro
7.50-7.99
Future All-Pro
7.00-7.49
Pro Bowl-caliber player
6.50-6.99
Chance to become Pro Bowl-caliber player
6.00-6.49
Should become instant starter
5.50-5.99
Chance to become NFL starter
5.20-5.49
NFL backup or special teams potential
5.01-5.19
Better-than-average chance to make NFL roster
5.00
50-50 Chance to make NFL roster
4.75-4.99
Should be in an NFL training camp
4.50-4.74
Chance to be in an NFL training camp
NO GRADE
Likely needs time in developmental league