2017 fantasy football RB profiles, projections (41-80)

2017 projections coming soon ... stay tuned.

In just a few short years Jeremy Hill went from surefire fantasy superstar to an afterthought in his own backfield. At least that's how things look with Joe Mixon set to take over in Cincinnati. Hill's magical rookie campaign seems like a distant memory thanks to back-to-back years of disappointing performances marred by slow, inefficient rushing (3.6, 3.8 yards per carry in 2015 and 2016, respectively). Touchdowns are the only thing that has kept Hill fantasy relevant, as he's scored 21 in the past two years and 30 in his brief career. With a healthy Tyler Eifert back in tow and Mixon stealing valuable carries, Hill's weekly fantasy outlook appears more in the Matt Asiata "praying for a 1-yard TD" mold than the touchdown machine he's been the past few seasons. Unless something drastic changes during training camp, Hill will be a low-upside depth pick, with minimal weekly viability as even a fantasy flex option.

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2016 stats: 222 att, 839 yds, 9 TDs, 27 tgt, 21 rec, 174 yds, 0 TD, 155.3 fantasy points

Entering his age-34 season, it's impressive Darren Sproles hasn't slowed down more. Last year the league's best jitterbug back still racked up 52 catches and nearly 1,000 total yards. What hurts Sproles' fantasy value is his low scoring output, and touchdowns could be harder to come by with LeGarrette Blount now likely taking the vast majority of goal-line work. Still, Sproles' utility will give him a safe-ish weekly floor, as long as he can keep Wendell Smallwood at bay as the primary third-down and hurry-up back. At some point, Father Time will come for Sproles. Here's to hoping it's not until 2018.

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2016 stats: 94 att, 438 yds, 2 TDs, 71 tgt, 52 rec, 427 yds, 2 TDs, 110.5 fantasy points

For a game and a half, C.J. Prosise looked like the answer in Seattle's backfield. Unfortunately, the impressive rookie broke his collarbone in the second game, ending that hopeful start. With Eddie Lacy crowding the backfield this offseason as a free agent signing, Prosise will be fighting for touches from the outset. Fortunately for him, he's the best pass-catcher of the bunch (he played wide receiver in college), and figures to have the team's third-down, hurry-up role locked in. Prosise is a great mid- to late-round PPR option, but falls a little farther down in standard until we get a better sense of the target/carry distribution in this bunch.

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2016 stats: 30 att, 172 yds, 1 TDs, 19 tgt, 17 rec, 208 yds, 0 TD, 44.0 fantasy points

While Duke Johnson's natural ability isn't in question, what that amounts to in fantasy remains an issue. Through two pro seasons, Johnson has found the end zone just three times, putting an extremely low cap on his fantasy value in formats other than PPR, where he at least provides some weekly reliability (57 catches per year average). Isaiah Crowell figures to lead this backfield, and Johnson's value will be minimal outside of PPR unless the workload shifts more in Johnson's favor throughout training camp and the preseason.

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2016 stats: 73 att, 358 yds, 1 TDs, 74 tgt, 53 rec, 514 yds, 0 TD, 91.2 fantasy points

In the past, plenty of players have parlayed postseason success into a breakout fantasy campaign. Could James White be the next in line? While he looks to have a large chunk of the passing-down back role in the New England offense, the arrivals of Brandin Cooks and Rex Burkhead figure to dilute the market share of targets divvied up by Tom Brady, potentially lowering White's week-to-week viability. It'll be worth rostering White, but owners will need to read the tea leaves each week to determine if it's worth the risk of starting White in such a crowded backfield.

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2016 stats: 39 att, 166 yds, 0 TDs, 86 tgt, 60 rec, 551 yds, 5 TDs, 101.7 fantasy points

Pretty much everything broke right for Murray in 2016. He was the favored goal-line option in a high-powered offense, finding the end zone 12 times despite only receiving 47 percent of the backfield opportunities (targets and attempts). Now in Minnesota, Murray trades in his elite offensive line for one of the worst in the league. Per Pro Football Focus' Pat Thorman, Murray had only eight runs of at least 15 yards on his 195 carries behind a top-three offensive line (per PFF's ranking) in Oakland, while his two rookie backups combined for 14 such runs on 25 fewer carries. The sledding is going to be tougher for Murray in Minnesota, but the scoring opportunities near the end zone should still be there as Matt Asiata and his 17 attempts inside the 5-yard line are gone. Murray's upside is limited, but he should offer a safe-ish floor as second-tier fantasy rusher.

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2016 stats: 195 att, 788 yds, 12 TDs, 43 tgt, 33 rec, 264 yds, 0 TD, 175.2 fantasy points

The Packers desperately needed depth at the running back position, and they found it in the NFL draft, starting with Jamaal Williams. Williams is BYU's all-time leading rusher, and has plenty of fans in the draft community. A subpar combine outing could have pushed him farther down the board, but his college production is impressive. Williams figures to start the season behind Ty Montgomery for the Packers.

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2016 stats: -- att, -- yds, -- TDs, -- tgt, -- rec, -- yds, -- TD, -- fantasy points

The Patriots poached Mike Gillislee from the Bills this offseason, with the expectation being that he'll essentially fill the role vacated by LeGarrette Blount. That should pique the interest of savvy fantasy drafters, as Blount was a late-round gem last year who led the league with 18 rushing scores. Gillislee gives the Patriots a nice mix of speed and power in his 5-foot-11, 219-pound frame, and he was both a big-play and goal-line threat for the Bills. He'll be part of a crowded backfield that also features Super Bowl hero James White, offseason addition Rex Burkhead, and Dion Lewis, but Gillislee's scoring upside in both real life and fantasy is the highest of the bunch. He's a great target in the middle to late rounds for owners who load up on wide receivers early.

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2016 stats: 101 att, 577 yds, 8 TDs, 11 tgt, 9 rec, 50 yds, 1 TD, 116.7 fantasy points

Numerous challenges face Giovani Bernard as the 2017 season approaches. For starters, he has to fully recover from an ACL tear last November and regain the quickness and lateral agility that were hallmarks of his game. Secondly, he'll have to prove capable of handling a complementary role to rookie Joe Mixon, whom most expect to lead this backfield come September. Bernard's best fantasy skill was as a pass-catcher, as he averages 3.4 catches per game in his career, and posted 43-plus receptions in each of his first three seasons. With Mixon or Jeremy Hill ticketed for early downs and goal-line work, Bernard will have to make his hay as a receiver, making him really only a viable fantasy option in PPR formats.

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2016 stats: 91 att, 337 yds, 2 TDs, 51 tgt, 39 rec, 336 yds, 1 TD, 83.3 fantasy points

Throughout the draft process, many thought Alvin Kamara would be a perfect fit for the New Orleans Saints ... and then they actually drafted him. However, for fantasy purposes, Kamara might be a year away from being a weekly player to trust. That's largely because Adrian Peterson and Mark Ingram -- two highly-paid veterans -- currently stand in his way on the depth chart. Kamara might find a role as a pass-catcher early on, but volume will be tough to trust in such a crowded, talented backfield. He's at best a super late-round flier, but could be left to the waiver wire as well.

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2016 stats: -- att, -- yds, -- TDs, -- tgt, -- rec, -- yds, -- TD, -- fantasy points

Terrance West was mired in a battle last year with Kenneth Dixon, but in the end the veteran was the more productive fantasy option. That should be the case again in 2017, as Dixon must serve a four-game suspension to start the year, leaving West in the lead spot. The only other back the Ravens brought in was Danny Woodhead, who is coming off an ACL tear and figures to be the team's primary pass-catcher out of the backfield. That should set West up as the early-down and goal-line specialist in an offense that could be ripe for a bounce-back season with Joe Flacco and others getting healthier. West will come at a supreme discount in fantasy drafts but holds excellent upside, at least for the first four games. He's a prime ZeroRB candidate in the middle to late rounds.

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2016 stats: 193 att, 774 yds, 5 TDs, 45 tgt, 34 rec, 236 yds, 1 TD, 137.0 fantasy points

Life comes at you fast in the Patriots backfield. In the span of a season, Lewis went from beloved late-round fantasy sleeper to a possible cut by the team. Lewis missed much of 2016 on the IR-boomerang recovering from an ACL tear, and then lost much of his former pass-catching back role to James White, who saw 15 more targets than Lewis from Week 11 to 17. Lewis' fantasy outlook is even more bleak with the additions of Rex Burkhead and Mike Gillislee this offseason.

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2016 stats: 64 att, 283 yds, 0 TDs, 24 tgt, 17 rec, 94 yds, 0 TD, 37.7 fantasy points

With Doug Martin injured for much of last year, Charles Sims had a chance to audition for the featured role. That audition didn't go too well as he was hit with injuries of his own, but perhaps Sims can get back in a better spot filling his more typical change-of-pace role. Back in 2015, Sims was the RB22 on a mere 158 touches. Sims should see plenty of work during the first three weeks while Martin is suspended, making him well worth a late-round speculative pick. Sims gets an added bump in PPR formats as well, as he notched 51 catches his last full season and is a dangerous runner in space.

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2016 stats: 51 att, 149 yds, 1 TDs, 32 tgt, 24 rec, 190 yds, 1 TD, 43.9 fantasy points

2016 was not kind to Shane Vereen, or at least his triceps. The veteran back tore the muscle initially in Week 3, spent 10 weeks on the IR-boomerang, only to re-tear the same muscle in Week 15. Heading into this season Vereen took a pay cut to stay with the team and figures to be the team's primary third-down back, and the first name called upon if/when Paul Perkins stumbles. Vereen is a low-upside stash candidate but could have added value in PPR formats. The Giants backfield is likely one to avoid outside of Perkins and maybe Vereen.

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2016 stats: 33 att, 158 yds, 1 TDs, 19 tgt, 11 rec, 94 yds, 0 TD, 27.2 fantasy points

Chris Thompson has seen his role grow in the Washington offense in each of the last two years, so there's potential for that trend to continue into 2017. However, with Rob Kelley and Samaje Perine battling it out for the lion's share of the early-down carries, Thompson will probably be ticketed for the third-down and hurry-up role -- one he can handle with aplomb. His 49 receptions a season ago ranked 12th among running backs, and with Pierre Garcon and DeSean Jackson out of the mix, there could be a few more targets to go around this year. Thompson could offer a solid flex floor in standard leagues but is mainly a PPR option in fantasy.

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2016 stats: 68 att, 356 yds, 3 TDs, 62 tgt, 49 rec, 349 yds, 2 TD, 98.5 fantasy points

One of fantasy's most prominent icons for the past decade or so, Jamaal Charles will be suiting up with a new team in 2017. The 30-year-old back signed a one-year deal with the Denver Broncos, but with no guaranteed money attached to the deal, there's no guarantee Charles is on the Week 1 roster. That will depend on his health, as the veteran has suffered two major knee injuries in the past two years, limiting him to eight games and just 83 carries since 2014. Charles would figure to be a rotational/depth option for the Broncos, who will likely have C.J. Anderson and last year's fourth-round pick Devontae Booker battle for starting duties. As sad as it might seem, it's entirely possibly we've passed the point where Charles' name isn't just one of the first called in fantasy drafts, but one that is called at all.

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2016 stats: 12 att, 40 yds, 1 TDs, 3 tgt, 2 rec, 14 yds, 0 TD, 11.4 fantasy points

A long-time special teamer and role player for the Bengals, Rex Burkhead finally stepped into the fantasy spotlight late last year as the starting back in Week 17. In that game, he rushed 27 times for 119 yards and two touchdowns while adding in two catches for 25 yards. Optimism was soaring when Burkhead first signed with the Patriots, but then in typical Patriots fashion they went out and signed another back (Mike Gillislee), forming yet another frustrating committee. Burkhead will be well worth a late-round pick in case he emerges in the New England backfield, but he'll face an uphill battle when it comes to securing reliable touches for fantasy.

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2016 stats: 74 att, 344 yds, 2 TDs, 20 tgt, 17 rec, 145 yds, 0 TD, 58.9 fantasy points

Jerick McKinnon's true believers simply can't catch a break. With Adrian Peterson in New Orleans and Matt Asiata still a free agent, this was looking like McKinnon's year. Then the team went out and signed Latavius Murray to replace Asiata and drafted Dalvin Cook to replace Adrian Peterson. Welp. McKinnon is a freakish athlete but has yet to bring that raw ability to fruition on the field consistently in three pro seasons. McKinnon will be in 2017 what he's always been -- a fantasy football fever dream unlikely to come true. Still ... it's not a terrible idea to throw a late-round pick at him. You know, just in case.

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2016 stats: 159 att, 539 yds, 2 TDs, 53 tgt, 43 rec, 255 yds, 2 TDs, 105.4 fantasy points

For a few weeks last year Jacquizz Rodgers was an absolute fantasy stud. But that's largely because the team forced an absurd 82 touches on his 5-foot-7 frame in a three-game span (he still averaged 4.32 yards per carry). Rodgers could be in line to lead this backfield for the first three weeks while Doug Martin is suspended, and will retain handcuff value the rest of the season (Martin is far from the picture of health).

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2016 stats: 129 att, 560 yds, 2 TDs, 16 tgt, 13 rec, 98 yds, 0 TD, 77.8 fantasy points

Prior to the Raiders coaxing Marshawn Lynch out of retirement, Richard was headed towards sleeper status. With Beast Mode back in tow, however, Richard now drops into the handcuff, deep sleeper range. Lynch will dominate the touches in this backfield, while Richard and DeAndre Washington battle for the scraps. Richard could hold some value in deeper PPR formats, but will likely need Lynch to be hit with an injury to find enough touches in the loaded Oakland offense to be a weekly fantasy option.

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2016 stats: 83 att, 491 yds, 1 TDs, 39 tgt, 29 rec, 194 yds, 2 TDs, 86.5 fantasy points

Teams often covet size-speed freaks at the running back position, which explains why the Texans sunk a third-round pick to get D'Onta Foreman. After amassing 2,028 rushing yards last season, Foreman ran a blazing 4.45-second 40-yard dash at his pro day while weighing north of 230 pounds. The Texans are committed to Lamar Miller as their starting back, but admit they need to lessen his workload. Connecting the dots, Foreman looks to have a small weekly role carved out for himself to spell Miller, but what exactly that entails remains to be seen. He could be the new Alfred Blue, coming in for a series or two at a time. But if he ends up stealing goal-line work from Miller, Foreman will have low-end standalone flex value as well. Stay tuned.

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2016 stats: -- att, -- yds, -- TDs, -- tgt, -- rec, -- yds, -- TD, -- fantasy points

The T.J. Yeldon featured back experiment officially died when the Jaguars drafted Leonard Fournette with the fourth overall pick. Perhaps that's a good thing, though, as Yeldon seemed ill-suited for the job. He could potentially slide into a pass-catching specialist role for this offense after accumulating 86 receptions in two seasons, and over four targets per game. His upside will be limited with Fournette expected to dominate the backfield touches, but Yeldon will have low-end flex appeal in PPR formats.

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2016 stats: 130 att, 465 yds, 1 TDs, 68 tgt, 50 rec, 312 yds, 1 TD, 87.7 fantasy points

Everything that was said about Jalen Richard applies to DeAndre Washington as well. While he showed flashes of promise as a rookie, his sophomore season will mostly be spent as a rotational player behind the great Marshawn Lynch. While this is wonderful for the Raiders, it's a problem for fantasy players. Given Lynch was playing through multiple injuries the last time we saw him (2015), it's wise to roster one of his potential backups. If he were to go down, Washington and Richard would jump into flex consideration almost immediately.

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2016 stats: 90 att, 265 yds, 1 TDs, 15 tgt, 10 rec, 62 yds, 0 TD, 68.2 fantasy points

With two broken legs to his name in his brief NFL career, Thomas Rawls' star diminished quickly following his breakout at the end of the 2015 season. Health will be a key factor in Rawls' usage in 2017 because as of right now he figures to be a complement off the bench to the recently signed Eddie Lacy. Pete Carroll has long been a big fan of Rawls, which helps his cause, but touches might be hard to come by with Lacy and C.J. Prosise each figuring to have sizeable roles. Of course, the Seahawks believe wholeheartedly in competition dictating their depth chart, so Rawls could win the job outright (Lacy does have health and weight issues of his own, after all). Nevertheless, the combination of this crowded backfield and Rawls' recent injuries definitely knocks him down draft boards into the late-round stash territory.

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2016 stats: 109 att, 349 yds, 3 TDs, 17 tgt, 13 rec, 96 yds, 0 TD, 62.5 fantasy points

Wendell Smallwood acquitted himself quite well as a rookie buried in a deep backfield committee in an offense led by a rookie quarterback. Trying to extrapolate what his 2017 role will be from that small sample, is, well, difficult. The Eagles signed LeGarrette Blount in the offseason to fill the early-down and goal-line role, and Darren Sproles is still hanging around to be the team's primary pass-catcher (he saw 71 targets last year compared to Smallwood's 13 and Ryan Mathews' 14). Given that both Blount and Sproles are north of the dreaded 30-year marker for running backs, Smallwood is an excellent stash candidate in the later rounds. The Eagles reloaded their passing game as well with Alshon Jeffery and Torrey Smith, so scoring opportunities could be more plentiful than last year. Smallwood just might need an injury to one of the other backs to see them, though.

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2016 stats: 77 att, 312 yds, 1 TDs, 13 tgt, 6 rec, 55 yds, 0 TD, 40.7 fantasy points

Drafting handcuffs can be a bit of a waste, given that they eat up a valuable bench spot and potentially offer your lineup nothing at all. But of those worth owning, Darren McFadden ranks highly on the list. That's because he's backing up a true workhorse in Ezekiel Elliott, and we've seen him succeed in this offense before (2015 - 1,417 total yards, three touchdowns). If you're into drafting high-upside handcuffs or took Elliott in Round 1, consider giving Run DMC a call too.

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2016 stats: 24 att, 87 yds, 0 TDs, 5 tgt, 3 rec, 17 yds, 0 TD, 10.4 fantasy points

It might not be this year, it might not be before 2050 even, but at some point Frank Gore will slow down. And if it is this year, Robert Turbin could be in line to see a healthy uptick in his workload and fantasy viability. Last year, Turbin came in as one of the league's best touchdown vultures, stealing seven touchdowns from inside the opponent's 10-yard line last year (Gore scored four such touchdowns). However, even if Gore keeps grinding, as usual, this year, Turbin could have flex appeal in deeper standard leagues or touchdown-only formats.

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2016 stats: 47 att, 164 yds, 7 TDs, 35 tgt, 26 rec, 179 yds, 1 TD, 82.3 fantasy points

The one thing Kenyan Drake really has going for him is speed. This guy can fly. Unfortunately, his opportunities to do so in 2017 could be quite limited, as Jay Ajayi figures to be the workhorse out of the Miami backfield. If Drake can steal more work from Damien Williams, he might inch closer toward flex consideration. But as it stands, his weekly workload will be too unreliable to make him anything more than a stash candidate.

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2016 stats: 33 att, 179 yds, 2 TDs, 10 tgt, 9 rec, 46 yds, 0 TD, 34.5 fantasy points

It might feel like ages ago, but back in 2015 Chris Ivory finished the season as the RB8 overall in fantasy. A fresh contract with the Jaguars and their crumbling offense last year quickly cast Ivory out of fantasy favor, and now his outlook is even worse with high-profile rookie Leonard Fournette coming to town. Ivory could find fantasy value if he's cut or traded to another team, but with the Jaguars his outlook is bleak.

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2016 stats: 117 att, 439 yds, 3 TDs, 28 tgt, 20 rec, 186 yds, 0 TD, 74.5 fantasy points

The Buffalo backfield took some hits in free agency, which opens the door for Jonathan Williams to step into a larger role, or at the very least be LeSean McCoy's top backup. Williams was a stud in college at Arkansas but opened his career buried on the Bills depth chart. With Mike Gillislee in New England and Karlos Williams simply out of the picture, Williams will be a name to keep an eye on this offseason. His upside as a Shady replacement or even complement as Gillislee was at times last year makes him an ideal late-round fantasy target.

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2016 stats: 27 att, 94 yds, 0 TDs, 2 tgt, 1 rec, 0 yds, 0 TD, 11.4 fantasy points

Few players have brought their careers back from the brink like Tim Hightower. He was out of the league from 2012 to 2014, came back in 2015 and turned into a solid contributor for the Saints the last two years. Now, he's hoping to fill the same role in San Francisco. Hightower's stock took a hit when the team traded up to draft Joe Williams out of Utah, a back head coach Kyle Shanahan loves, but he'll still be around as a nice depth add or handcuff to the oft-injured Carlos Hyde.

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2016 stats: 133 att, 548 yds, 4 TDs, 26 tgt, 22 rec, 200 yds, 1 TD, 104.8 fantasy points

The Chargers made no moves this offseason to add depth behind Melvin Gordon, leaving Branden Oliver as the next man up. The team relied heavily on Gordon in 2015, and likely will again after he rose up to the challenge, but expect Oliver to be worked in a bit more to spell Gordon, at least on passing downs. As a standalone prospect, Oliver offers little fantasy appeal in such a deep offense, especially considering he's coming back from a torn Achilles that cost him all of 2016. But he has produced in fantasy before and should be a high-priority waiver-wire pickup or handcuff in the event Gordon gets injured or shows signs of wearing down.

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2016 stats: -- att, -- yds, -- TDs, --- tgt, -- rec, -- yds, -- TD, -- fantasy points

Many fantasy analysts loved the idea of Devontae Booker as a late-round steal last year, backing up the frequently injured C.J. Anderson. Well, Booker got his chance to be the featured back in 2016 but left the football world wildly unimpressed (3.12 yards per carry, three touchdowns in six games). Now, Booker will have to learn a new offensive system and fight both Anderson and Jamaal Charles for carries. That sinks his value a bit, though he could mesh more with the power-running scheme likely to be employed by new offensive coordinator Mike McCoy. There's no reason to give up on Booker, but he might be best left as a speed dial call off the waiver-wire rather than a precious fantasy draft pick.

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2016 stats: 174 att | 612 yds | 4 TDs | 45 tgt | 31 rec | 265 yds | 1 TD | 111.7 fantasy points

Frank Gore continues to give Father Time the Heisman, but his days as a featured back are numbered. Enter Mack, who as a rookie at the very least offers the Colts offense the big-play potential it has sorely been lacking in the backfield. The Colts mustered a mere four runs of 20-plus yards in 2016, while six of Mack's 15 rushing touchdowns last year were 43-plus yards. Mack's best value right now is as a high-upside handcuff, but there's a chance he pushes for more work, and weekly fantasy flex consideration in deeper leagues.

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2016 stats: -- att, -- yds, -- TDs, -- tgt, -- rec, -- yds, -- TD, -- fantasy points

It's worth paying attention when Kyle Shanahan moves up in the draft for an offensive skill position player, and that's exactly what he did in Round 4 to grab Joe Williams from Utah. Williams is a very talented runner with an impressive combination of size (210 pounds) and speed (4.41-second 40-yard dash). Williams was super productive in college but fell down draft boards after he briefly retired from the team to deal with personal issues. When he came back from his "retirement" he ran for 1,332 yards in seven games -- an average of over 190 yards per game. Williams will likely start the season behind Carlos Hyde on the depth chart, but given Hyde's injury history and potential fit issues in Shanahan's offense, Williams will be a high-value handcuff to take in the later rounds who could be leading this backfield by season's end if things break his way.

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2016 stats: -- att, -- yds, -- TDs, -- tgt, -- rec, -- yds, -- TD, -- fantasy points

Coming off of season-ending neck surgery, Ryan Mathews' future with the Eagles, and football future in general, remain in question. Mathews looked great at times last year, resembling the featured back we'd seen in spurts over his career, but injuries ultimately could sadly be his undoing. The Eagles may cut Mathews after signing LeGarrette Blount this offseason, but if Mathews is healthy enough to land with another team he could have some sneaky fantasy value. Stay tuned.

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2016 stats: 155 att, 661 yds, 8 TDs, 14 tgt, 13 rec, 115 yds, 1 TD, 131.6 fantasy points

As a back with a complete skill set, Jeremy McNichols landed in a great spot in Tampa Bay and Dirk Koetter's offense. Unfortunately for the rookie, his path to touches could be difficult once Doug Martin returns from his three-game suspension to start the year. Of course, if McNichols establishes himself as a legit featured back in those first few weeks (he'll have to leapfrog Charles Sims and Jacquizz Rodgers to do so), he might just hang onto the role full-time. That upside and the potency of the Bucs re-loaded offense make McNichols worth a late-round flier in fantasy drafts this fall.

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2016 stats: -- att, -- yds, -- TDs, -- tgt, -- rec, -- yds, -- TD, -- fantasy points

The days of Alfred Blue working his way into the Texans backfield rotation may be coming to a close. Last year, the team signed Lamar Miller to be a workhorse back and then drafted D'Onta Foreman in the third round to help spell Miller and fill in on short yardage duties. Blue could be worth a stash in deeper leagues, but he's unlikely to make much of a fantasy impact in 2017 without things changing ahead of him on the depth chart.

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2016 stats: 100 att, 420 yds, 1 TDs, 16 tgt, 12 rec, 40 yds, 0 TD, 50.0 fantasy points

Working in as a role player while the Dolphins backfield was in flux and briefly at the end of the season, Williams set career highs pretty much across the board in 2016 (rushing TDs, targets, receptions, receiving yards, receiving TDs). That being said, unless you can see the future and know which games he'll be more involved in, he's better left for the waiver-wire or as Jay Ajayi insurance on a deeper bench.

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2016 stats: 35 att, 115 yds, 3 TDs, 32 tgt, 23 rec, 249 yds, 3 TDs, 70.4 fantasy points

A favorite of #DraftTwitter, Zach Zenner stole the hearts of fantasy fans desperate for a running back late last season. Forced into the starting role by injuries, Zenner amassed 266 total yards and three scores during the final three weeks of the season (eighth-most points in that span). Unfortunately for Zenner, the healthy returns of Ameer Abdullah and Theo Riddick are likely to push him once again out of the spotlight. He is a bigger back, though, and could fight for goal-line duties. For now, he falls back into high-upside stash territory or waiver-wire fodder.

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2016 stats: 88 att, 334 yds, 4 TDs, 23 tgt, 18 rec, 196 yds, 0 TD, 75.0 fantasy points

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