NFL Votes - Voter Facts, Key Dates, FAQs | NFL.com

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Voter Facts, Key Dates, FAQs

FACTS

· Over 100 million voting-eligible Americans did not vote in the 2016 election. (ElectionDay.org)

· The voter turnout rate for the 2016 U.S. presidential election was only 56%. The rate is even lower for midterm elections – 2018, the highest midterm turnout on record, only had a voter turnout of 49.6%. (Pew Research) (FairVote)

· In 2016, voter turnout for Blacks dipped to 59.6%. While that number was lower than whites (65.3%), it was still higher than Asians (49.3%) and Hispanics (47.6%). (Brookings)

· Only 64% of the U.S. voting-age population were registered to vote in 2016, compared with 91% in Canada (2015) and the UK (2017), 96% in Sweden (2014), and 99% in Slovakia (2016). (Pew Research)

· From 1972 to 2012, citizens 18-29 years old turned out at a rate 15 to 20 points lower than citizens 30 year and older. (Fair Vote)

· Looking at the most recent nationwide election in the most developed countries in the world, the U.S. placed 26th out of 32 in voter turnout. (Pew Research)

· If citizens are registered to vote, they are much more likely to participate in the democratic process. In 2016, 86.8% of registered U.S. voters cast a ballot, fourth highest among the most developed countries in the world. (Pew Research)

· In the 2018 midterms, all major racial and ethnic groups saw historic jumps in voter turnout. Hispanics and Asians each saw their turnout rates increase to about 40%. For both groups this was about a 13-percentage point increase over 2014. Meanwhile, voter turnout rates for whites (57.5%) and blacks (51.4%) increased by 11.7 and 10.8 percentage points, respectively, from 2014. This voting population was the most racially and ethnically diverse ever for a midterm election. (Pew)

DATES TO KNOW

July 26 – 100 Days Until Election Day

August 6 – 55th Anniversary of the Signing of the Voting Rights Act

August 26 – 100th Anniversary of Women's Suffrage

September 22 – National Voter Registration Day

October 4 Some states begin to impose voter registration deadlines*

October 24 – Vote Early Day

November 3 – Election Day

  • *The National Voter Registration Act of 1993 requires that states set their voter registration deadlines for Federal election no more than 30 days before an election. Some states set their registration deadline at this 30-day mark, whereas others permit voters to register up to Election Day and anywhere in between.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Why is the league launching this voter education and registration effort at this moment?

  • We recognize that voting is one of our most fundamental rights, so we want to use our platform to advocate for all members of the NFL family to exercise it.

Does the NFL support a specific party or political agenda?

  • Our effort is non-partisan. As a league, our role is to support all efforts made by members of our NFL Family as they seek to cast their vote. We commit to doing our part to encourage voter education, registration and then activation, and we plan to team up in the coming weeks with national nonpartisan groups to assist us in these efforts moving forward.

Who is involved in the league's voting initiative?

  • This is a collaborative, league-wide effort that includes the NFL Players Association and other player leaders. The league also is partnering with three nonprofit, nonpartisan organizations – I Am A Voter, RISE to Vote, and Rock the Vote – to advance our goal of increasing civic engagement in NFL communities across the country. These organization were chosen because of their mission, capacity and experience to engage communities, register voters, and increase voter participation and turnout.

How can I take part in this initiative and make sure that I am registered and able to vote in the upcoming elections in my state?

  • Click on the links and visit the websites of our nonpartisan partners to find out more about the requirement and process to register to vote and cast a ballot in the elections.

PARTNERS IN ACTION

Our democracy works best when we all participate.

Our democracy works best when we all participate.

Unify the nation to end racism and champion social justice.

Unify the nation to end racism and champion social justice.

Register to Vote and more

Engage young people in politics and build our collective power.