Published: July 7, 2016 at 10:06 p.m.
Updated: March 29, 2018 at 12:34 p.m.

Football in baseball stadiums

The 2018 Major League Baseball season opens today featuring all 30 teams playing on the same day for the first time in 50 years. Baseball and football have shared a close history, with players from both sports playing on the same field often just days apart. From Yankee Stadium to the O.co Coliseum, take a look at some of the best football-baseball hybrid fields.

15 Photos Total

  • Oakland's O.co Coliseum is the only remaining stadium shared by a Major League Baseball team and an NFL team. To this day, early season Raiders games feature the distinctive infield cutout that conjures up memories of a bygone era in sports -- when football teams played home games in stadiums designed primarily for baseball. The Raiders moved into the Coliseum in 1966 and played there until their move to Los Angeles following the 1981 season. When the team moved back to Oakland, the Raiders again called the Coliseum home. 15

    Aaron Kehoe/Associated Press

    O.co Coliseum

    Oakland's O.co Coliseum is the only remaining stadium shared by a Major League Baseball team and an NFL team. To this day, early season Raiders games feature the distinctive infield cutout that conjures up memories of a bygone era in sports -- when football teams played home games in stadiums designed primarily for baseball. The Raiders moved into the Coliseum in 1966 and played there until their move to Los Angeles following the 1981 season. When the team moved back to Oakland, the Raiders again called the Coliseum home.

  • Candlestick served as home to the 49ers from 1971 through the 2013 season. From 1971 through 1999, the team shared the facility with baseball's Giants, who were the stadium's original tenants. Candlestick has hosted an astonishing eight NFC Championship games, the latest being the New York Giants' <a href="http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-game-highlights/09000d5d8263bd32/GameDay-Giants-vs-49ers-highlights" target="new">20-17 overtime win over the 49ers</a> in the 2011 NFC Championship. 14

    Al Golub/Associated Press

    Candlestick Park

    Candlestick served as home to the 49ers from 1971 through the 2013 season. From 1971 through 1999, the team shared the facility with baseball's Giants, who were the stadium's original tenants. Candlestick has hosted an astonishing eight NFC Championship games, the latest being the New York Giants' 20-17 overtime win over the 49ers in the 2011 NFC Championship.

  • Qualcomm Stadium -- formerly known as San Diego Stadium (1967-1980) and Jack Murphy Stadium (1981-1997) -- is the current home of the Chargers, who started playing in the stadium in 1967. From 1969 through 2003, the Chargers shared the stadium with baseball's San Diego Padres. Qualcomm is also host to college football's San Diego State Aztecs and has served as the home stadium for the Holiday Bowl since 1978. 13

    NFL Photos

    Qualcomm Stadium

    Qualcomm Stadium -- formerly known as San Diego Stadium (1967-1980) and Jack Murphy Stadium (1981-1997) -- is the current home of the Chargers, who started playing in the stadium in 1967. From 1969 through 2003, the Chargers shared the stadium with baseball's San Diego Padres. Qualcomm is also host to college football's San Diego State Aztecs and has served as the home stadium for the Holiday Bowl since 1978.

  • Originally built for baseball's Houston Astros, the Astrodome was a common host of football games. In addition to the Houston Oilers, the University of Houston, the United States Football League's Houston Gamblers and the World Football League's Houston Texans each called the dome their home. The Oilers played at the stadium from 1968 until the franchise moved to Tennessee in 1997 and ultimately became the Titans. 12

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    Astrodome

    Originally built for baseball's Houston Astros, the Astrodome was a common host of football games. In addition to the Houston Oilers, the University of Houston, the United States Football League's Houston Gamblers and the World Football League's Houston Texans each called the dome their home. The Oilers played at the stadium from 1968 until the franchise moved to Tennessee in 1997 and ultimately became the Titans.

  • The longtime home of baseball's Baltimore Orioles served as a temporary host for the Baltimore Ravens from 1996-1997 before the team's current stadium -- M&T Bank Stadium -- was completed. Memorial Stadium is more famously known for its time as the home of the Baltimore Colts, who won the 1959 NFL Championship game at the stadium. 11

    Nick Wass/Associated Press

    Memorial Stadium

    The longtime home of baseball's Baltimore Orioles served as a temporary host for the Baltimore Ravens from 1996-1997 before the team's current stadium -- M&T Bank Stadium -- was completed. Memorial Stadium is more famously known for its time as the home of the Baltimore Colts, who won the 1959 NFL Championship game at the stadium.

  • Busch Stadium served as temporary home to the St. Louis Rams for one year before the team moved into the Edward Jones Dome, but was home to the St. Louis Cardinals of the NFL from 1966 through 1987. 10

    Leon Algee/Associated Press

    Busch Stadium

    Busch Stadium served as temporary home to the St. Louis Rams for one year before the team moved into the Edward Jones Dome, but was home to the St. Louis Cardinals of the NFL from 1966 through 1987.

  • "The Mistake by the Lake" was home to the Cleveland Browns from 1946 until the team went on a three-year hiatus following the 1995 season. The Browns, however, weren't the first NFL team to call the stadium home. The Cleveland Rams joined the NFL in 1937 and called the stadium home until 1945 when -- following a 15-14 win over the Washington Redskins in the NFL Championship game held at Cleveland Municipal Stadium -- the franchise moved to Los Angeles. The Browns made the place famous first for an amazing run of championships from 1946 through 1955, and then an epic series of playoff misfortunes in the 1980s. 9

    Mark Duncan/Associated Press

    Cleveland Municipal Stadium

    "The Mistake by the Lake" was home to the Cleveland Browns from 1946 until the team went on a three-year hiatus following the 1995 season. The Browns, however, weren't the first NFL team to call the stadium home. The Cleveland Rams joined the NFL in 1937 and called the stadium home until 1945 when -- following a 15-14 win over the Washington Redskins in the NFL Championship game held at Cleveland Municipal Stadium -- the franchise moved to Los Angeles. The Browns made the place famous first for an amazing run of championships from 1946 through 1955, and then an epic series of playoff misfortunes in the 1980s.

  • The Green Bay Packers played their last game at Milwaukee County Stadium on Dec. 18, 1994. The Packers won the game in dramatic fashion, with quarterback Brett Favre scoring the winning touchdown in the final seconds in a 21-17 win over the Atlanta Falcons. The game ended a unique two-city tradition for the Packers, who had split games between Green Bay and Milwaukee for 62 consecutive seasons. The arrangement to play at the baseball stadium was at times vital to the Packers' survival. Between 1933 and 1994, the Packers split games between Green Bay and Milwaukee. In Milwaukee, the team played at Borchert Field (1933), Wisconsin State Fair Park (1934-1951), Marquette Stadium (1952) and then County Stadium. 8

    Todd Ponath/Associated Press

    Milwaukee County Stadium

    The Green Bay Packers played their last game at Milwaukee County Stadium on Dec. 18, 1994. The Packers won the game in dramatic fashion, with quarterback Brett Favre scoring the winning touchdown in the final seconds in a 21-17 win over the Atlanta Falcons. The game ended a unique two-city tradition for the Packers, who had split games between Green Bay and Milwaukee for 62 consecutive seasons. The arrangement to play at the baseball stadium was at times vital to the Packers' survival. Between 1933 and 1994, the Packers split games between Green Bay and Milwaukee. In Milwaukee, the team played at Borchert Field (1933), Wisconsin State Fair Park (1934-1951), Marquette Stadium (1952) and then County Stadium.

  • An entire generation of football fans might only know of the Falcons as a dome team -- since they've played at the Georgia Dome since 1992. However, the Falcons were once an outdoor team, playing in a stadium shared with baseball's Atlanta Braves. The Falcons played at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium from their inaugural season of 1966 through 1991. 7

    Judy Ondrey/Associated Press

    Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

    An entire generation of football fans might only know of the Falcons as a dome team -- since they've played at the Georgia Dome since 1992. However, the Falcons were once an outdoor team, playing in a stadium shared with baseball's Atlanta Braves. The Falcons played at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium from their inaugural season of 1966 through 1991.

  • Yankee Stadium served as home of the New York Giants from 1956 through 1973. It also served as home of the NFL's New York Yanks from 1950-1951, the AAFC's New York Yankees from 1946-1949, and the original New York Yankees of the NFL from 1927-1928. 6

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    Yankee Stadium

    Yankee Stadium served as home of the New York Giants from 1956 through 1973. It also served as home of the NFL's New York Yanks from 1950-1951, the AAFC's New York Yankees from 1946-1949, and the original New York Yankees of the NFL from 1927-1928.

  • War Memorial Stadium -- a longtime home of minor league baseball in Buffalo -- was the Bills' home yard from 1960 through 1972. The Bills won an American Football League title game at the stadium in 1964, a 20-7 win over the San Diego Chargers. The place nicknamed "the Rockpile" might be most commonly known as the home stadium of Roy Hobbs' New York Knights in the movie "The Natural." 5

    Bob Schutz/Associated Press

    War Memorial Stadium

    War Memorial Stadium -- a longtime home of minor league baseball in Buffalo -- was the Bills' home yard from 1960 through 1972. The Bills won an American Football League title game at the stadium in 1964, a 20-7 win over the San Diego Chargers. The place nicknamed "the Rockpile" might be most commonly known as the home stadium of Roy Hobbs' New York Knights in the movie "The Natural."

  • "The Friendly Confines" was the Chicago Bears' home stadium from 1921-1970 and hosted five NFL championship games. When <a href="http://www.profootballhof.com/players/george-halas/" target="new">George Halas</a> moved the Decatur Staleys to Chicago in 1921, the team was eventually renamed the Bears to better identify with the city's famous baseball team. Naming football teams after the local baseball team was a common practice at the time (ie. New York Football Giants). 4

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    Wrigley Field

    "The Friendly Confines" was the Chicago Bears' home stadium from 1921-1970 and hosted five NFL championship games. When George Halas moved the Decatur Staleys to Chicago in 1921, the team was eventually renamed the Bears to better identify with the city's famous baseball team. Naming football teams after the local baseball team was a common practice at the time (ie. New York Football Giants).

  • Forbes Field was home to baseball's Pirates for more than 60 years, but also hosted many football games. As well as serving as home for the University of Pittsburgh football team, Forbes Field hosted Steelers games from 1933 through 1963. In 1947, Forbes Field hosted the Steelers' only playoff game -- a 21-0 defeat to the Philadelphia Eagles -- before the famous <a href="http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-films-americas-game/09000d5d801413cd/NFL-Network-America-s-Game-1974-Pittsburgh-Steelers" target="new">"Immaculate Reception" game</a> in 1972. 3

    NFL Photos

    Forbes Field

    Forbes Field was home to baseball's Pirates for more than 60 years, but also hosted many football games. As well as serving as home for the University of Pittsburgh football team, Forbes Field hosted Steelers games from 1933 through 1963. In 1947, Forbes Field hosted the Steelers' only playoff game -- a 21-0 defeat to the Philadelphia Eagles -- before the famous "Immaculate Reception" game in 1972.

  • The Philadelphia Eagles played at Shibe Park -- which was baseball's first steel-and-concrete structure -- from 1940 until 1957. Shibe Park was host to <a href="http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-network-top-ten/09000d5d80498bf1/Top-Ten-Weather-Games-1948-NFL-Championship" target="new">one of the most famous weather games in NFL history</a>, the 1948 NFL Championship. Played in blizzard conditions, the Eagles defeated the Chicago Cardinals, 7-0. 2

    NFL Photos

    Shibe Park

    The Philadelphia Eagles played at Shibe Park -- which was baseball's first steel-and-concrete structure -- from 1940 until 1957. Shibe Park was host to one of the most famous weather games in NFL history, the 1948 NFL Championship. Played in blizzard conditions, the Eagles defeated the Chicago Cardinals, 7-0.

  • The Giants, who hosted four NFL Championships at the Polo Grounds, played at the Upper Manhattan stadium from 1925 until 1955, when the team moved to Yankee Stadium. When the American Football League was formed, the New York Titans played four seasons at the Polo Grounds before moving to Shea Stadium. Noted for its distinctive shape and distant center-field wall, the Polo Grounds was host to many famous football games (primarily college) in its time, most notably the historic Notre Dame win over Army in 1924 that helped spawn <a href="http://archives.nd.edu/research/texts/rice.htm" target="new">Grantland Rice's piece</a> about "The Four Horsemen." 1

    John Lent/Associated Press

    Polo Grounds

    The Giants, who hosted four NFL Championships at the Polo Grounds, played at the Upper Manhattan stadium from 1925 until 1955, when the team moved to Yankee Stadium. When the American Football League was formed, the New York Titans played four seasons at the Polo Grounds before moving to Shea Stadium. Noted for its distinctive shape and distant center-field wall, the Polo Grounds was host to many famous football games (primarily college) in its time, most notably the historic Notre Dame win over Army in 1924 that helped spawn Grantland Rice's piece about "The Four Horsemen."