Cardinals' Larry Fitzgerald returning for 2020 season

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Larry Fitzgerald isn't done yet.

The Arizona Cardinals announced the receiver will return in 2020 for his 17th pro season, signing Fitzgerald to a one-year contract. He had been set to become a free agent.

NFL Network Insider Ian Rapoport reports Fitzgerald's deal is worth $11 million with incentives, per sources informed of the contract.

Fitzgerald's future has been the subject of speculation each season of the past several years. Yet the 36-year-old continues to produce.

Fitzgerald snagged 75 receptions for 804 yards and four touchdowns in 2019, all team highs. Even as things seem to change constantly in Arizona, Fitzgerald's production remains as steady as a rock.

The veteran's ability to get open on quick routes meshes well with Kliff Kingsbury's offense and Kyler Murray's lightning-fast release. Perhaps Fitzgerald will no longer burn past receivers, but he still owns the route-running ability to box out defenders and vice-grip hands to snag pigskins in close quarters.

While the Cards hope someday soon one of their young guns overtakes Fitzgerald as a true No. 1 target, Kingsbury understands the vital role the veteran plays for his offense to move the chains consistently.

"I think he's playing as good as anybody, honestly," Kingsbury said at the close of the season. "You watch what he does week-in and week-out, the little things, the blocking and the toughness that he brings to the offensive side of the football. We missed him twice for huge plays yesterday. He's just still creating separation. He does it all."

The 11-time Pro Bowler and former Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year sits No. 1 in Cardinals history in catches (1,378), receiving yards (17,083) and receiving TDs (120).

Fitzgerald trails only Jerry Rice in NFL history in catches and receiving yards. The Cardinals wideout needs 171 receptions and 5,812 yards to tie Rice. It would take a few more seasons to come close to those numbers, but Fitzy is at least inching closer to records that once seemed outlandish for any wideout to get near.

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