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Bills GM: We'll 'definitely' keep LeSean McCoy for '19

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LeSean McCoy's on-field struggles amid what has been a disappointing season for the Buffalo Bills put him at the forefront of trade speculation last month, but the team isn't giving up on the 30-year-old running back.

Bills general manager Brandon Beane told The Buffalo News that McCoy remains part of the team's plans for 2019.

"LeSean is still a very good player in this league," Beane said. "Our offense is not where we want it, but LeSean is still playing well. He's a talented player. We like what he brings, to the point we'll have him back in 2019. He'll definitely be a part of that."

While the Bills might be pleased with McCoy all things considered, he's struggling to make an impact on offense. He's averaging a career-low 3.4 yards per carry this season and still hasn't scored a touchdown this season. The 257 yards he's churned out is the fewest he's ever had at the midway point of a season.

"I ain't expect to have no season like this," McCoy said after Monday's loss to the New England Patriots. "I'm not really playing well at all. ... It's a different season. I'm 30 years old, playing since when I've been in high school. This stuff [has] never happened to me. It is tough."

Unless things change over the second half of the season, it's fair to wonder if McCoy would want to stay in Buffalo for what could be another season of roster building. Multiple teams contacted the Bills about McCoy before the trade deadline and it's reasonable to believe another club would be willing to pick up the final year of his contract in exchange for a draft pick or two.

It's nearly impossible to predict the week-to-week futures of NFL players in the constantly changing NFL landscape. Time will tell if McCoy will truly remain part of the Bills' plans for 2019. Beane understands the Bills' growth centers upon the team bolstering its talent pool via the draft.

"You have to build through the draft, and it takes time. ... You can't build up a nucleus just through free agency," Beane said. "You've got to grow them. As much as we're in an impatient world, if you want something to last, you have to build it the right way."

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