GIFs that help tell the story of the NFL in Week 10

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Every week of the NFL season tells a story. GIFs -- pronounced "gifs", "jifs" or "gee-oafs" -- can do the same thing. So let's tell the story of Week 10 through GIFs.

I grew up in a suburb 20 miles north of Manhattan, a Jets fan in a town filled with Giants diehards. Throughout my formative years, I envied how the majority lived. The Giants had down seasons, sure, but storm clouds never seemed to linger for long. There was always a plan. You couldn't say the same thing with the Jets. Still can't, really.

And it's that personal history that makes the Giants' current plight unexpectedly fascinating to me. The 1-8 Giants have hit rock bottom following another non-competitive loss against the previously winless 49ers. With Eli Manning entering his twilight and a complete reboot of the braintrust seemingly inevitable, venerable "Big Blue" is about to start from scratch.

You really have to go back to the pre-Parcells days of the 1970s to find the last time the Giants seemed this lost at sea. There are layers and layers of question marks here. It's fair to wonder how much this could affect contract extension talks with Odell Beckham Jr., the team's most important (and most unpredictable) player.

Some of my closest friends and family members are Giants fans. I don't take joy out of the possibility they are about to sit through years of subpar football. But I'll keep it real, too: It doesn't totally suck watching big brother take it on the chin for once.

I can't be the only person who saw Dion Lewis do that, and immediately think of ...

... this. Game, blouses.

I'm not trying to be a killjoy here, but it might be time to reel in some of these touchdown celebrations. It kind of reminds me of the turn of the Willennium, when the cool kids bleached their hair, stole beaded chokers from Hot Topic and wore tinted sunglasses indoors. I'll use the least charismatic character from Entourage as an example. Even in real time, you knew there would be regrets down the road.

I feel the same for the celebrations that ape popular childhood games. I suppose on one level it's a powerful expression by the players: Football is just a game, after all, a sport these men fell in love with as boys on the playground. But that's probably not it. I give the Vikings credit for originality in the sense that they started this craze with their juvenile "Duck, duck, goose" routine on Monday Night Football in Week 5. But this isn't exactly what I had in mind when the NFL relaxed its celebration rules. I mean, was I really the only one who found the Chiefs' potato sack race in Week 9 incredibly corny?

If I am, so be it. Just let me sit on my porch and holler at the kids until it's time for bed at 8 p.m.

Kickers are fascinating creatures, aren't they? They exist in their own pro football ecosystem: One of the boys, but not quite. They aren't viewed as gridiron warriors, but when the game is on the line, they become the most important player on the field. It's institutional incongruity.

The insane pressure that goes with the job perhaps explains why kickers have some of the most exuberant celebrations every year. Above you see Josh Lambo executing an impressive ftbol slide after taking out the Chargers at The Chlorine Pit on Sunday. Seconds later, CBS cameras captured Lambo hopping around like a mad man as fellow Jaguars teammates mill around the field for standard postgame bro-hugs and jersey swaps.

Lambo is like a guy still up at 3 a.m. looking for an afterparty.

Teddy Bridgewater returned to active duty for the Vikings for the first time in 672 days on Sunday. A shocking non-contact knee injury -- a freak setback that left teammates ill on the practice field -- nearly ended Bridgewater's NFL career in unspeakably cruel fashion. He didn't see a snap in Minnesota's win over the Washington Redskins, but his tearful pre-kickoff reaction told the story of a man processing a victory over the odds.

Case Keenum has played well and deserves to keep the starting job for the Vikings. Still, it's hard not to root for more chapters in Bridgewater's feel-good story.

Just a reminder to keep your dignity and rooting interests intact when an opposing player enters your airspace. I'm not saying you should dump a beer on the guy or anything, but this dad serves as a PSA of how not to handle such a situation. Mark Ingram is right to shoo him away.

Producer 1: "Guys, we can't just keep bringing up over and over that Ryan Fitzpatrick went to Harvard. Literally every football fan in the world is aware of this fact. It's broadcast trope at this point."
Producer 2: "Point taken, Bill, but then how do we remind the audience that Fitzpatrick is an Ivy League-educated brainiac? It's not like we can, like, toss him a Rubik's cube and have him solve it during the telecast."
Producer 1: "Terry, you're a g-ddamn genius."

NFL sideline personnel should treat Brock Osweiler starts in the same manner baseball fans should approach sitting in the first few rows at MLB stadiums. Keep your attention on the field and always be prepared for the possibility of flying projectiles approaching at a high rate of speed.

This season is playing out like one long goodbye to John Fox as an NFL head coach. It certainly summons memories of Jeff Fisher's last rodeo in 2016. This moment from the Bears' loss to the Packers is particularly interesting because you can pinpoint the exact moment Fox realizes he royally messed up his replay challenge, a decision that likely cost the Bears seven points in a game they lost by -- yep -- seven points.

This is what happens when you out-Fox yourself. I'll see myself out.

Dan runs the End Around section of NFL.com and hosts the award-winning Around The NFL Podcast. Follow him on Twitter if you want.

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