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Pete Carroll: Thomas Rawls 'fully back' for Seahawks

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Propelled by Thomas Rawls' long-awaited return to dominant rookie-year form, the Seahawks enjoyed their first 40-point game since November of 2013 in Sunday night's lopsided victory over the Panthers.

Although Rawls averaged 108.0 yards as a starter in 2015, his sharp-cutting performance versus Carolina was the first time he reached the century mark since fracturing his ankle at this time a year ago.

Seattle's coaching staff was confident the breakout game was just a matter of time.

"I kind of talked about him in the team meeting (Saturday) night, that we could see Thomas really go and explode," coach Pete Carroll said, via ESPN.com, after the game. "Because he had such a great week of preparation. I think he finally felt like he was fully back."

Whereas Rawls lacked his trademark burst in September after missing the entire offseason, he is now channeling the punishing style that he once described as possessed to the point of getting "out of his body."

Even with suspect blocking that held the offense hostage in a Week 12 loss at Tampa Bay, there's ample reason to believe Seattle's ground attack is just hitting its stride.

Since Rawls returned three weeks ago, the Seahawks are second in the league in rushing yards per game (173) and first in yards per carry (6.41).

That balance is excellent news for a suddenly explosive offense that has also welcomed Russell Wilson, Jimmy Graham and Tyler Lockett back to full health after grinding through early-season injuries.

This might just be the most frightening big-play offense of the Carroll dynasty.

The Seahawks scored on eight of 11 possessions Sunday night, posting season-highs in rushing yards (240), yards per play (7.5) and first downs (27). Their 534 total yards were the second-most of any game since Wilson arrived as franchise savior in 2012.

They're going to need that high-octane attack in January after losing free safety Earl Thomas, the All Pro linchpin in Carroll's Cover-3 defense.

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