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Aaron Rodgers: You don't know where flaws lie

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By nearly every account from the Green Bay Packers' locker room during Wednesday's media availability, Aaron Rodgers was edgy and at least slightly irritated.

Part of the irritation seemed to stem from his play.

"I didn't play as well as I wanted to last week, and I turned the ball over twice, and I can't do that if we're going to win the game," he said, per USA Today. "So I've got to play better, and I've got to play more efficiently on offense."

Another part of the frustration seemed to be directed at the consistent picking apart of the Packers' disappointing offense.

When asked about questions regarding his footwork and fundamentals, Rodgers retorted:

"I feel pretty good about my fundamentals. I'm a two-time USA All-Fundamentals teams. First team. I have the helmets at the house. True story."

Bang! Eat that, "Media"! Where are your helmet trophies? You get a grammar trophy in grade school?

It's understandable for Rodgers to be frustrated. We believed -- as we assume he did, as well -- that the Packers offense would bounce back after a wayward 2015. That hasn't been the case so far.

As I pointed out Monday, Rodgers hasn't thrown for more than 300 yards in 11 games; eight of those contests he's tossed fewer than 250 yards (including both in 2016). He's gone 14 straight contests with a passer rating below 100. Last year Rodgers threw for a career-low 6.7 yards per attempt. He's worse through two games this season, at 5.9.

Heck, this summer the quarterback even admitted he sometimes got lackadaisical in his footwork and noted the offense needed to run smoother.

There have been some excellent looks this week at Rodgers' and the Packers' struggles. This one from Danny Kelly at The Ringer and this from Oliver Connolly at All22.com, to name two.

With all the fretting over the Packers offense, Rodgers knew he'd get questioned about it Wednesday.

"You guys have a job to do," Rodgers said to reports, "so do your job. Make your opinions and scrutinize, but we're not worried about your opinions. And we're not going back having sleepless nights worried about what you guys are saying about our offense. Because you guys don't know what plays we're running, you don't know where the execution is, you don't know where the flaws in the execution lie."

It's true that writers and analysts -- even former players pointing out Rodgers' struggles -- don't know the specifics of the playbook, but let's not act like football is rocket science or brain surgery.

I'll leave the play-by-play breakdowns to others, but I'd like to highlight one thing from Rodgers' words: "You don't know where the flaws in the execution lie." He does not deny there are flaws, just who knows what those flaws are exactly.

The irritated man in the locker room is also the only one who can fix them.

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