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Todd Bowles: Ryan Fitzpatrick is Jets' starting QB

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With the Ryan Fitzpatrick saga over in New York, Jets coach Todd Bowles stated the obvious in regards to the team's starting quarterback position.

"It's his job," Bowles said.

It was one of the least-surprising pronouncements of the summer, but nonetheless notable after the Jets spent the offseason propping up Geno Smith's qualities as a starting option.

Fitzpatrick put up one of the best seasons in franchise history in 2015 throwing 31 touchdown passes. That production after he filled in following the infamous Smith punch debacle led to a summer of back-and-forth over Fitzpatrick's worth.

The sides finally found middle ground Wednesday night, the eve of training camp, agreeing to a $12 million deal.

Fitzpatrick said he was comfortable with a one-year deal, despite the lack of security.

"I would much rather pass up on some of that guaranteed money ... and bet on myself and just see what happens," he said.

On Thursday, Fitzpatrick was back on the field with teammates. Reporters noted during practice that Fitzpatrick got the majority of first-team reps, but shared part of the duty with Smith.

Bowles brushed aside the idea that Smith's roster spot is in jeopardy. The coach added that Smith is entrenched as the backup. With rookie Christian Hackenberg in house, second-year player Bryce Petty could be the odd man out, barring injury or New York electing to keep four quarterbacks.

"Geno's here at No. 2 right now unless Bryce and Hack have some great gain, if they come along like gangbusters," Bowles said. "No. 2 right now, it's open. If Fitz has some setbacks ... something else. Geno's one, I mean Fitz is one, Geno's two, Bryce is three, Hack is four."

With Fitzpatrick's return, the Jets hope a prolific passing offense with Brandon Marshall and Eric Decker continues to flourish in Year 2 under Chan Gailey. Now Fitzpatrick must prove he was worth the offseason consternation for Jets fans and the $12 million price tag paid to a career journeyman.

"I have something to prove every year," Fitzpatrick said.

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