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Matt Forte hopes to 'turn back the time' with Jets

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Perhaps Matt Forte got the chorus of those loathsome Bon Jovi DirecTV commercials stuck in his head. Perhaps he's been jamming to Twenty One Pilots' latest album.

Whatever the cause, the 30-year-old running back said one reason he chose to sign with the New York Jets this offseason was the team's training staff, which he hopes will help him "turn back the time" on his career.

"That was one of the reasons for me wanting to come here, because the training room is so good," Forte told NJ.com this week. "At this point in your career, health is so important. You're not as young as you used to be, or recover as fast as you used to. But if you get the right (trainers) in there and work with them, you can turn back the time."

During his eight years with the Chicago Bears, Forte toted the rock 2,035 times in the regular season and added 487 receptions. Last season, the tailback carried for a career-low 898 yards and missed three games due to injury.

Father Time will always remain undefeated, but Forte hopes a combination of Jets trainers working magic and offensive coordinator Chan Gailey's system will help stave off the aging process as he begins his post-30 career. Gailey has already said he'd tailor the game plan to Forte's strengths.

"That's what really good coordinators do," Forte said. "...I'm looking forward to getting back into having a fullback, a lead blocker, a power-type running game," Forte said. "I see myself being used the same way I've always been used in my entire career, in the passing game and in the run game. Whether that's being split out or running routes from the backfield, we've yet to determine that. But I'm pretty sure both will be accomplished."

With the nauseating questions under center continuing to churn, the Jets hope Forte can recapture his old form at Florham Park. One of the top dual threats in the NFL should be an intriguing piece for Gailey's offense, which ran better last season with a pass-catching threat in the backfield. 

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