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Big Ben: Steelers plan to keep going for two after TDs

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If there is a point-after-try revolution on the way, the Pittsburgh Steelers are at the forefront.

Ben Roethlisberger zipped two passes for two-point conversions following early touchdowns Sunday in the Steelers' 43-18 win over the San Francisco 49ers.

Every game, all season

Pittsburgh is three for three on two-point tries this season, after the extra point was moved back to the 15-yard line. Pittsburgh became the first team in 17 years to successfully convert a two-point try in the first quarter. And they won't stop going for two either.

"Oh, we're going to keep doing it," Roethlisberger said, via ESPN.com. "We don't practice it this much to not do it. We practice it every single day. ... I tried to tell you guys early on that we would do it, and I think you guys kind of didn't quite believe it. But it's something we feel comfortable with."

Thorough two games, kickers have missed nine extra points (94.2 percent) after making them at a 99.4 percent clip from the shorter distance in 2014. Steelers kicker Josh Scobee is a member of the missed-kick club, after failing to convert the extra point following Pittsburgh's third touchdown Sunday.

For Big Ben, converting two points provides a strategic advantage over opponents, which makes the risk worth the potential reward.

"If you're up 8-0 and they go score, they have a decision to make," said Roethlisberger of opponents. "We feel like we're a team that's going to do it enough that it's going to be hard to get a beat on us."

Coach Mike Tomlin said the Steelers wouldn't enter a game planning to go for two at a greater rate, but rather make the determination based on game flow.

"As we start to play, particularly work the ball down the field on the drive that produced the touchdowns before the point after, we got a little inclination of maybe what their personality might be at least in terms of matching our personnel," Tomlin said, via PennLive.com.

In other words: If the Steelers are whooping an opponent up and down the field -- like Sunday -- they'll go for two to drive the dagger home.

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