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Kelly: Eagles will assess everything, including QB

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The cacophony of cries emanating from Philadelphia hit fever pitch levels following Sunday's disastrous 20-10 home loss to the rival Dallas Cowboys.

The Eagles' offense was a pathetic amalgam of missed blocks, dropped passes, terrible throws and poorly-timed play calls.

Following the contest, Chip Kelly -- who remade the team to his liking this offseason -- admitted the entire operation will be re-evaluated in the coming weeks.

A snippet of his back-and-forth with the media, as transcribed by the team:

Do you have the right guys in there?

KELLY: We'll see. We'll see. We've got to assess everything.

Are you pretty surprised with how the team has come out in these first two games?

KELLY: Yeah, I think everybody is.

Do you think you're getting the effort from the guys...

KELLY: Yeah, I think we're getting the effort. I just don't -- I thought our defense played outstanding today. I don't think the offense did anything, especially in the run game, where we could complement what our defense was doing. I thought our defense played really well tonight, and I think our offense did not play well at all.

When you say you're going to evaluate everything, does that include the quarterback?

KELLY: That includes everybody; coaches, everybody.

To say the offense did nothing is almost kind. The erratic unit sustained zilch until garbage time. The offensive line couldn't handle the Cowboys' stunts, leading to multiple blown blocks. DeMarco Murray couldn't shed free tacklers as the Eagles compiled a whopping seven total rushing yards combined -- led by Sam Bradford's nine -- with Murray amassing a grand total of two on 13 carries.


While Bradford's receivers gave him zero help, the quarterback missed too many throws, couldn't handle the rush and made some horrendously terrible decisions.

Kelly's offseason moves were met with a dash of head scratching and a chorus of "trust the process" calls this summer. After two straight losses to open the season, the narrative will morph into questions about whether it was Kelly's system that won 10 games his first two years or whether, maybe, it was Andy Reid's players after all.

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