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Jets QB Brunell files bankruptcy plan to keep memorabilia

  • By NFL.com
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Mark Brunell is proud of the Super Bowl ring he won as the New Orleans Saints' backup quarterback in the 2009 season. Now he doesn't want to lose it in bankruptcy.

Brunell, who filed for Chapter 11 protection last June, submitted a reorganization plan in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Jacksonville, Fla., on Monday, and it evidently calls for him to pay for some of the football memorabilia he received during his career, including his Super Bowl ring, The Florida Times-Union reported Tuesday.

An investment in 12 Whataburger restaurant franchises in Jacksonville played a key role in Mark Brunell's financial troubles.
An investment in 12 Whataburger restaurant franchises in Jacksonville played a key role in Mark Brunell's financial troubles. (Paul Jasienski/Associated Press)

The memorabilia, which also includes his 1991 college national championship ring won at the University of Washington, has an estimated value of $16,300, which would be used as partial payments to Brunell's creditors. It's unclear where Brunell would receive the money to buy back the property.

Brunell, who spent last season behind Mark Sanchez, signed a two-year deal with the New York Jets in 2010, but the second year of the deal isn't guaranteed. The filing said Brunell's "future income is highly uncertain."

With his future earnings in doubt because of his contract status and the NFL lockout, Brunell's reorganization plan proposes that he sell off certain assets worth a total of $378,300 to pay off his unsecured creditors.

In addition to two championship rings, Brunell is seeking to buy back three Rose Bowl rings earned during his time at Washington, two watches, helmets, jerseys and shotguns, according to the court filing.

Brunell became wealthy during a lucrative and successful NFL career that began with the Green Bay Packers in 1993. He was the first quarterback for the expansion Jacksonville Jaguars in 1995, receiving three Pro Bowl nods with the team while entrenching himself in the community. But two failed business partnerships -- a real-estate development company called Champion LLC and an investment in 12 Whataburger restaurant franchises -- led the quarterback to his present financial state.

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