Anatomy of a Play  

 

'Hawks find holes to help Washington run into history in style

  • By Greg Smith NFL Films
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As I watched Leon Washington slash through the Chargers' kickoff coverage unit twice in Week 3, for the longest and second-longest kick returns in Seahawks history, I couldn't help but notice his gloves.

Like the pink accessories many NFL players wear in support of breast cancer awareness or the gold shoes sprinters where while breaking world records, that blinding shade of neon green stands out. It makes a statement.

Deion Sanders stood out. He was a two-sport athlete that stole 186 bases in the Major Leagues and intercepted 53 passes in the NFL. He's perhaps the greatest cornerback to ever play.


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"Neon Deion" could also make a statement. As one of the original self-promoting athletes, before the days of Terrell Owens and Chad Ochocinco, Sanders turned himself into a brand name. He went by "Prime Time," hung out with M.C. Hammer, choreographed touchdown dances, and high-stepped his way into NFL history.

While Washington isn't as flashy as Sanders, he stood out like a neon sign last Sunday.

He returned the opening kickoff of the second half 101 yards for a touchdown, giving Seattle a 17-0 lead. Then, after the Chargers tied the game at 20 midway through the fourth quarter, he raced 99 yards for the winning score.

It was a statement game that would have made Sanders proud -- and did, in fact. Washington earned the No. 1 ranking from Sanders in NFL Network's weekly segment, "Let's Go Primetime." Sanders used to rap about money, now he's rhyming about players like Washington:

"He's so nice, we had to give it to ya twice!"

You probably won't see Washington high-stepping, dancing or rapping, but another return touchdown or two wouldn't be a surprise. And he just might have earned himself a new nickname.

Neon Leon?

If the glove fits ...

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