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Know your stats about prostate cancer

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  • By National Football League
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American Urological Association Foundation teams up with NFL to fight prostate cancer


Baltimore -- While most men might know the stats of their favorite NFL player, they are likely unaware of other important statistics that could one day save their lives. As a result, the American Urological Association (AUA) Foundation and the NFL are teaming to encourage men to "Know Your Stats about Prostate Cancer," the second-leading cause of cancer death for American men. Men and their loved ones can visit www.KnowYourStats.org for information about prostate cancer and where to find free or low-cost screening locations.

What you should know
Prostate defense starts at 40. Talk with your doctor about prostate cancer testing.

» The American Urological Association recommends that men ages 40 and older talk with their doctor about prostate cancer testing including the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and a simple physical exam.
» Knowing your score today could help save your life later. Establishing a baseline PSA score at age 40 can help doctors better interpret your future PSA scores.

Know Your Stats - and don't let prostate cancer take you out of the game. Visit www.KnowYourStats.org to learn more.

One in every six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime. To fight this deadly disease, the AUA has issued new guidelines recommending that men 40 and older talk with their doctors about prostate cancer testing. A physical exam and simple blood test to establish a baseline PSA (prostate-specific antigen) score today could help save a life later.

"We encourage men to be as passionate about their health as they are about their favorite NFL teams and players," said NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

The relationship between the AUA Foundation and the NFL began in 2007 when the NFL Player Care Foundation began implementing prostate cancer screenings conducted by the AUA Foundation. The NFL Player Care Foundation was created in 2007 to address health and quality of life issues encountered by retired players.

To promote September's Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 27 members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame recorded a public service announcement to urge men to get tested for prostate cancer. Led by Hall of Famer and prostate cancer survivor Mike Haynes, the message also features football legends, or "Team Haynes" members, including Tony Dorsett, Anthony Munoz, "Mean" Joe Greene, upcoming "Dancing with the Stars" contestant Michael Irvin and more.

Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in males in the United States, killing more than 28,000 men in 2008. African-American men and men with a family history are at a higher risk for developing prostate cancer, with African-American men more than twice as likely to die from the disease.

"Men should talk with their doctors so they can make informed decisions about prostate cancer testing," said Robert S. Waldbaum, M.D., F.A.C.S, and AUA Foundation spokesperson. "Knowing your stats empowers patients and their doctors with the facts to make informed decisions."

Haynes, a Hall of Fame cornerback who later served as VP/Player Development at the NFL, is one of the many men who have benefitted from early detection due to prostate cancer testing. Before his diagnosis through a free NFL Player Care Foundation screening conducted by the AUA Foundation, prostate cancer was the last thing on his mind. Now a prostate cancer survivor, Haynes is speaking out, in partnership with the NFL and the AUA Foundation, encouraging men to talk to their doctors.

"Before I was diagnosed with prostate cancer, I never knew I was at risk for this disease. Now I know how important it is to play defense against prostate cancer and to start getting tested at 40," says Haynes. "A simple test saved my life."

The AUA Foundation will continue to work with the NFL Player Care Foundation to screen retired players across the country and encourage fans to get in the game where their health is concerned.

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