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Things I Learned in Fantasy Football: Week 3

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Takeaways from Week 3 as told through @MarcasG's tweets.

Aaron Jones salvaged the day by scoring a pair of touchdowns but otherwise, it was a day when he was pretty much outplayed by Jamaal Williams. The snap share going drastically in favor of Williams was a mild surprise, though maybe it shouldn't have been. Head coach Matt LaFleur said he wanted to even up the opportunities between the two. He wasn't lying. The hope now is that Jones is efficient with his touches and sees the bulk of the goal line snaps. Otherwise, we've just found ourselves in the midst of a potentially confounding timeshare.

Before the season began, Devonta Freeman was feeling like a draft steal coming off the board in the second round. A lot of that had to do with injury concerns after he missed 14 games in 2018. Nonetheless, as long as he could stay healthy in 2019, he seemed to be a lock to put up RB1 numbers. That has been far from the case through the first three weeks. A bad offensive line and a defense has continually put the team in a hole has effectively sidelined the run game. Losing safety Keanu Neal doesn't figure to make the situation any better and it's become fair to wonder how much of an impact Freeman will be able to make on a week-to-week basis. After his 95 scrimmage yard day, it might be time to try and sell high on him.

Speaking of trying to sell high on guys ... this didn't work as planned. On paper, this week's game against the Raiders looked like the perfect opportunity for Diggs to get on track. That didn't remotely happen. Diggs had just three targets that he caught for 15 yards. For the year, he has a grand total of 12 catches for 101 yards. It's a far cry from what you were expecting when you likely made him your WR2. Some of it has had to do with a slew of tough matchups to begin the season. But mostly it's because the Vikings have truly committed to being a run-first team. Add to it that Kirk Cousins more frequently targets the type of routes run by Adam Thielen and it's hard to see Diggs living up to his draft price. Next up on the schedule is the Bears so don't expect things to get better anytime soon.

When it comes to Michel, it seems to be more of the latter than the former. While we talk a lot about how Bill Belichick rotates running backs, the Patriots have become much easier to figure out in recent seasons. What has become apparent is that Michel just isn't effective with the ball in his hands. Yards per carry can frequently be a misleading statistic but Michel's 2.0 average through three games tells a pretty accurate story and explains why New England featured a heavy dose of Rex Burkhead on Sunday. If it weren't for the touchdown Michel scored early in the game, the day would have been a complete fantasy disaster. James White should return next week which could leave Michel as the odd man out.

Early last week when it started to look like Damien Williams wouldn't play and LeSean McCoy was looking iffy, we first thought it could be Darwin Thompson's time to shine. But as the week went on, the name Darrel Williams started to bubble to the surface. By the time Sunday ended, we'd seen a heavy dose of McCoy with a lot of Darrel Williams thrown in. Thompson saw just five offensive snaps -- all coming after McCoy left the game with an injury. If there was even the slightest chance you were waiting for Thompson to gain relevance, you can let it go now.

Maybe this is less about Derek Carr and more about the combination of Jon Gruden and Greg Olson but whatever it is, this is the second straight year that Oakland has injected a tight end into our fantasy lives. Last year, it was Jared Cook. This year, it's Darren Waller. Through three games, Waller's been targeted 26 times and is the Raiders most consistent option in the passing game. It's not a fluke. If you snagged Waller off waivers (or maybe drafted him late), you are now obligated to lord it over the rest of your league.

For the fourth time in three games, Chris Carson lost a fumble. This week, that led to C.J. Prosise seeing more than 55 percent of the snaps in the Seahawks backfield. It's obvious that the Seahawks love Carson's talent but his propensity to put the ball on the ground has become untenable. Just when you thought Rashaad Penny's fantasy value was dead.

First, all credit to Kyle Allen for looking great as a starter on Sunday. The four touchdown passes gave us hope that D.J. Moore and Curtis Samuel will retain their value while Cam Newton is on the mend. But the bigger news from Sunday was that Greg Olsen is back and as good as he's ever been. You're forgiven if you thought last week might have been a fluke. This week, Olsen backed it up with 75 yards and two scores against the Cardinals. Yes, Arizona is notoriously bad against tight ends but the encouraging part is that Olsen is a very real part of the Carolina passing game with seven or more targets in each game this season. With the position having been thinned out by injury and underperformance, it's nice to add a name back to the mix.

This surprised me, not because Breida won, but the margin by which he won. In each of the past two games, Mostert has outsnapped and out-touched Breida. This week, Mostert had more rushing yards as well. Wilson is the wild card that gets the goal line touches to completely foul everything up. This is the way things will be until Tevin Coleman returns when we'll all lose our collective minds trying to figure out how things work. Fun!

Wait...what?


* Davante Adams has had two games with just four catches. He only had one such game all of last season.

* No Colts receiver played more than 56 percent of snaps.

* Braxton Berrios (!) led the Jets in targets despite playing 59 percent of the snaps.

* Tony Pollard outscored Ezekiel Elliott.

And one for the road...


Marcas Grant is a fantasy analyst for NFL.com and a man who is literally #BSOHL. Send him your lifestyle achievements or fantasy football questions via Twitter @MarcasG. If you read all of that, congrats. Follow him on Facebook, and Instagram.

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