Photo of Malliciah Goodman
Drafted By: Falcons

Combine Results

Grade
67.7 ?
  • 4.87 SEC
    Top Performer
  • 26 REPS
    Top Performer
  • 31.5 INCH
    Top Performer
  • 114.0 INCH
    Top Performer

Draft Analysis:

"He's got real long arms. You're not sure if you want to play him outside or inside. I think he's versatile. He's one of the better pass rushers." -- Mike Mayock

  • 6'4" Height
  • 36 3/8" Arm Length
  • 276LBS. Weight
  • 11" Hands

Overview

A defensive end from Clemson has been selected in six of the last seven NFL drafts; four of those six were first- (late Gaines Adams) or second-round picks (Da’Quan Bowers, Andre Branch, Phillip Merling). Goodman is next Tiger likely to hear his name called from the Radio City Music Hall podium, probably in the top 50 picks.



The school’s reputation for producing pro pass rushers probably helped them land Goodman, a Parade All-American and top 100 national prospect (27 tackles for loss, 15 sacks as a senior) who graduated early from his Florence, South Carolina high school to join the team. Clemson coaches named him defensive co-rookie of the year for his play as a reserve in 2009 (six tackles for loss, two sacks), then gave him the defense’s “Future Impact Player” award as the top reserve end the following year (32 tackles, three forced fumbles). Goodman finally got a starting role in 2011, and though he didn’t put up huge stats (four tackles for loss, two sacks), showed the strength and agility to be a three-down NFL player. In his senior season, Goodman had by far his best season. He tallied 9.5 tackles for loss, seven sacks, and forced four fumbles.

Analysis

Strengths

Powerful left end prospect with thick upper and lower body builds, and long arms. Frame that would allow him to grow into five-technique if a team required it. Shows consistent hand placement, can control and pop off his man to make stops. Violent hands, often doesn't allow the offensive lineman to grab a hold of him when rushing the passer. Gets off the ball quickly for his size when in pass rush mode, bulling his man backwards or using his strength to work the outside shoulder. Also effective splitting double moves and beating guards when lined up inside on third down. Keeps his eyes in the backfield, will get his hands in passing lanes and shed and close to the quarterback if his man stops his feet when the play is extended. Shows good flexibility on end-twist stunts.

Weaknesses

Won’t be an elite pass rusher because of average straight-line speed and change of direction ability. Slow to disengage his hands. Doesn't counter well when locked up. Struggles to contain running backs on the edge when he takes a step inside. Inconsistent reacting to the snap, will be the last player moving at times.

NFL Comparison

Frank Alexander

Bottom Line

Goodman is not an overly impressive athlete, possessing only average speed and change of direction ability. He compounds this issue in the pass rushing department by being slow to react to the snap. However, he has a tremendous frame, with long arms, and active, violent hands. Posssess strength and can really get a push on his blocker, but needs to develop a better set of counter moves when engaged. Goodman fits the profile of a three down 4-3 strong-side defensive end.
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Grade Title Draft (Round) Description
96-100 Future Hall of Famer Top Pick A once-in-a-generation type prospect who could change how his position is played
85-95 Immediate Starter 1st An impact player with the ability/intangibles to become a Pro Bowl player. Expect to start immediately except in a unique situation (i.e. behind a veteran starter).
70-84 Eventual Starter 2nd-3rd A quality player who will contribute to the team early on and is expected to develop into a starter. A reliable player who brings value to the position.
50-69 Draftable Player 4th-7th A prospect with the ability to make team as a backup/role player. Needs to be a special teams contributor at applicable positions. Players in the high range of this category might have long-term potential.
20-49 Free Agent UDFA A player with solid measurables, intangibles, college achievements, or a developing skill that warrants an opportunity in an NFL camp. In the right situation, he could earn a place on a 53-man roster, but most likely will be a practice squad player or a camp body.

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