Photo of Jesse Williams
Drafted By: Seahawks
  • Round 5
  • Pick 4
  • Overall 137

Combine Results

Grade
85.5 ?
  • 30 REPS
    Top Performer

Draft Analysis:

"The reason he slid was medical. He ran a 4.92 on my watch at his pro day. If you look at his testing numbers and scheme versatility, you probably put a second-round grade on him." -- Mike Mayock

  • 6'3" Height
  • 32" Arm Length
  • 323LBS. Weight
  • 9 3/8" Hands

Overview

Williams’ family in Brisbane, Australia was so proud of his accomplishments and Alabama’s BCS championship that eight members of the clan (including his mother and father) were tattooed with the school’s logo and Jesse’s jersey number (54). That isn’t a big surprise to anyone seeing the vast amount of ink all over Williams’ body, which could be seen as an indication of the dedication and toughness he shows on the field on an every-down basis -– giving him a chance at a long NFL career.


He originally signed with Hawaii after playing for two club teams in Australia during his high school days (while also playing basketball and rugby). But he instead played for two seasons at Arizona Western Junior College, accumulating 13 tackles for loss and six sacks. He enrolled at Alabama in January 2011 so he could participate in spring practices -– a move that allowed him to start all 13 games as a five-technique defensive end. He was credited with 24 tackles, four for loss, on the season. With the departure of Josh Chapman to the NFL, Williams moved inside to handle nose tackle duties and started 13-of-14 games after sitting out the Western Kentucky game with concussion like symptoms. The Aussie showed more upfield ability than his predecessor, making 37 total tackles, 2.5 of which went for a loss including two half sacks. Williams added a blocked kick and continued to line up as a lead blocker in the Crimson Tide's goal line package.

Analysis

Strengths

Brute nose tackle (though he plays some five-technique) with a very good motor. Solid two-gap player who keeps his eyes in the backfield to find the ball. Plays with leverage, gets under the pads of his man to hold the line or push him into the backfield. Has enough quickness and power off the snap to pop off his blocker and grab backs heading outside or coming through the middle. Uses quick hands to swipe aside lunging blockers to penetrate into the backfield. Stays upright against cut blocks and gives second effort to get up when on the ground. Gets low with power in short-yardage situations. Also hustles to the sideline to chase scrambling quarterbacks and stretch plays when fresh. Pushes the pocket a bit as a pass rusher, and will work past lesser blockers’ shoulders into the backfield. Cleans up piles, sending linebackers flying.

Weaknesses

Not an exceptional athlete, relies on hustle and strength to make plays. Lacks the quickness and agility to be a regular factor in pass rush or corral quicker ballcarriers in space. Thick in the middle and a bit thinner in the legs; plays top-heavy, ends up on the ground too often. Gets caught up on blocks at times inside, lacking hand and foot quickness to disengage to make the play.

NFL Comparison

Sione Pouha

Bottom Line

This Australia native came through the junior college ranks before starting all 13 games for the 2011 BCS champions at five-technique and another 13 games at nose tackle in 2012. Williams uses his size, consistent motor and supreme toughness to drain his opponents at the point of attack. His best NFL position is likely at nose tackle, but Williams has enough athleticism to play multiple spots for a 3-4 team at the next level.
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Grade Title Draft (Round) Description
96-100 Future Hall of Famer Top Pick A once-in-a-generation type prospect who could change how his position is played
85-95 Immediate Starter 1st An impact player with the ability/intangibles to become a Pro Bowl player. Expect to start immediately except in a unique situation (i.e. behind a veteran starter).
70-84 Eventual Starter 2nd-3rd A quality player who will contribute to the team early on and is expected to develop into a starter. A reliable player who brings value to the position.
50-69 Draftable Player 4th-7th A prospect with the ability to make team as a backup/role player. Needs to be a special teams contributor at applicable positions. Players in the high range of this category might have long-term potential.
20-49 Free Agent UDFA A player with solid measurables, intangibles, college achievements, or a developing skill that warrants an opportunity in an NFL camp. In the right situation, he could earn a place on a 53-man roster, but most likely will be a practice squad player or a camp body.

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