Photo of Bradley McDougald

Combine Results

Grade
54.8 ?
  • 4.74 SEC
    Top Performer
  • 19 REPS
    Top Performer
  • 34.5 INCH
    Top Performer
  • 122.0 INCH
    Top Performer
  • 7.07 SEC
    Top Performer
  • 4.44 SEC
    Top Performer

Draft Analysis:

  • 6'0" Height
  • 32 1/2" Arm Length
  • 215LBS. Weight
  • 9 1/8" Hands

Overview

Any time McDougald feels sorry for himself because of a bad play on the field, he can take strength from his older brother, Brandon, who was diagnosed with cancer in the fifth grade, eventually losing his leg to the disease. Now Bradley carries both of their athletic dreams on his able shoulders, potentially going all of the way to the National Football League.



The Dublin, Ohio native originally committed to Ohio State, but decided to take the Jayhawks’ offer to play receiver instead of moving to safety like the Buckeyes correctly predicted his final position would become. As a true freshman, he played in every game on offense (33 catches, 318 yards), defense (five tackles, interception) and special teams (18.8 yards per kick return). He continued playing both ways in 2010, starting eight of the first 10 games at receiver (19-240, TD) and then the final two games of the year at safety (16 tackles, one interception, one pass break-up). He finally stayed on one side of the ball for the entire season in 2011, garnering honorable mention honors after starting all 12 games, making 90 tackles, six for loss, and five pass breakups; he returned one of his two interceptions on the year for a 57-yard touchdown against Missouri. In his final year, McDougald was named Coaches All-Big 12 second-team after finishing the year with 92 tackles, three interceptions, and two forced fumbles.

Analysis

Strengths

Possesses the height, length and athleticism you’d expect from a converted receiver. Good straight-line speed and above average agility. Ball skills are obviously a plus, as well, given his acumen as a receiver. Makes a lick on quarterbacks or receivers in a precarious position. Whether it’s attacking ball carriers behind the line of scrimmage or pounding a receiver waiting for the ball to arrive over the middle, uses his closing speed and a strong shoulder to send them flying.

Weaknesses

His overaggressive nature can be used against him, gets drawn towards the line by play action and can be fooled by misdirection. Angles to the ball and physicality as a tackler are inconsistent. Chooses to dive their feet instead of breaking down to corral them at times. Scouts will also ask him about a suspension during his senior year in high school, as well as his having to turn himself in last September on an outstanding warrant for not appearing in traffic court last July.

NFL Comparison

Chris Clemons (Dolphins)

Bottom Line

McDougald went to Kansas to be a receiver in their wide-open spread, instead of attending his hometown Ohio State to play safety; by the end of his sophomore year, however, he was a starter in the secondary for Kansas. While still learning correct tackling angles and technique, his size and athletic ability give him promise at the next level.
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Grade Title Draft (Round) Description
96-100 Future Hall of Famer Top Pick A once-in-a-generation type prospect who could change how his position is played
85-95 Immediate Starter 1st An impact player with the ability/intangibles to become a Pro Bowl player. Expect to start immediately except in a unique situation (i.e. behind a veteran starter).
70-84 Eventual Starter 2nd-3rd A quality player who will contribute to the team early on and is expected to develop into a starter. A reliable player who brings value to the position.
50-69 Draftable Player 4th-7th A prospect with the ability to make team as a backup/role player. Needs to be a special teams contributor at applicable positions. Players in the high range of this category might have long-term potential.
20-49 Free Agent UDFA A player with solid measurables, intangibles, college achievements, or a developing skill that warrants an opportunity in an NFL camp. In the right situation, he could earn a place on a 53-man roster, but most likely will be a practice squad player or a camp body.

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