Martavis
Bryant
Wide Receiver, Pittsburgh Steelers
Born: Dec. 20, 1991
Experience: 2 NFL seasons


With 13 touchdown catches in 15 career games, Martavis Bryant has become one of the NFL's most efficient scorers. The 6-foot-4 speedster discusses when he feels he first earned Big Ben's trust, credits the most difficult cornerback he's faced and reveals the warning he received when choosing to wear No. 10.


Interview by Ali Bhanpuri • Nov. 19, 2015
(Damian Strohmeyer/Associated Press)
Martavis Bryant
Wide Receiver, Pittsburgh Steelers
Born: Dec. 20, 1991
Experience: 2 NFL seasons

With 13 touchdown catches in 15 career games, Martavis Bryant has become one of the NFL's most efficient scorers in the NFL. The 6-foot-4 speedster discusses when he feels he first earned Big Ben's trust, credits the most difficult cornerback he's faced and reveals the warning he received when choosing to wear No. 10.

Interview by Ali Bhanpuri • Nov. 19, 2015


NFL Media's Oklahoma Drill series presents exclusive, quick-hitting one-on-one interviews with players and coaches from around the league. No nonsense -- just football experiences directly from the source.


I would say when I first got there, not being in shape like I was supposed to be and just overall learning everything over -- you feel like a freshman all over again.

The biggest difference is, my confidence is up more, and I'm more prepared. I'm a student of the game, and I'm learning from the great ones, like A.B. and Ben. I just come to work every day with the mindset that I want to get better.

I rank myself No. 1. I don't rank myself behind anyone. Not even A.B. He's my teammate, but I consider myself better. You can't go in with that mindset and think someone is better than you.
In less than two full seasons, Martavis Bryant (right) has almost as many receiving TDs (13) as Antonio Brown had after four (15). (Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press)

He's never gotten on me about anything. Just when I had got into trouble, I let him down a little bit.

Could I do it? Yeah, I'm not going to say I can't do it.

He's definitely misguided. My coach in college was a great receivers coach, but in the NFL, I learned how to become a better receiver -- how to pay more attention to the details. ... They have more wisdom, because they've been in the game a long time, and they're playing grown-man football.

My coach, Richard Mann. Doing a great job with me working on my technique. Being a student of the deep balls and just studying film and just correcting my mistakes and what I do in practice.

My hardest thing was getting better at route running. Everybody definitely knows it if you mess up and you're not in the right place, where you're supposed to be. You're always on an island, so when the ball's in the air, everybody in the stadium is looking at you.

If the ball is past me, it makes me speed up and run faster. Another gear definitely kicks in. My teammates tell me that.

My favorite route would definitely be a go route. But I can run any route.

His best quality is Big Ben being Big Ben, making plays, making something out of nothing. He's a tough guy.

Last year, when I started making plays in the game. And his trust really, really increased during the offseason ... and especially after I got in trouble and I went down and got help and everything ... he really looked at me as maturing into a man.

It was hard to deal with because he's the best back in the NFL. And it was hard to to see him go down like that again, especially against the same team that did it last year. There were a lot of feelings about that, but, at the same time, we got a great secondary backup, DeAngelo Williams, who's a great running back and a great veteran.
Santonio Holmes' stint wearing No. 10 in Pittsburgh ended in ignominious fashion in 2010, when he was traded to the Jets. (Lynne Sladky/Associated Press)

They asked me if I wanted it, so I was like, "Yeah, I'll go with it." They was like, "You know what comes behind wearing this number? You know the last receiver who wore this number?" And I said, "Yeah, but I don't go by superstitions. So let me get that."

He used to call me Big 'Tone. Now he calls me 10. He calls me Tay-Tay sometimes. I love playing for him. He's the best head coach I've ever had. He's humble. He's all about business, which is how I am. And when it's time to go to work, it's time to go to work.

The one who usually gives me the most hassle is the one from Kansas City because he's my height. He takes up a lot of space when you're trying to run a route.

Only if you talk trash to me. I usually stay quiet. But if you get me going -- I get going.

My favorite receiver is Randy Moss, and I try to do some of things that he does and a lot of people have compared me to him. But I could never be Randy Moss -- I'm always going to be Martavis Bryant.

He's playing great ball right now, so I'm not judging what he does when he gets in the end zone. Like he said, if you don't want him dancing, stop him from getting in the end zone. As long as he keeps scoring, I want him to keep dancing. I like seeing it. It's funny.

Most intimidating -- James Harrison. He just bullies everybody. He doesn't bully me, but he goes in on the trainers and stuff. He just does it to play around with them. He's really a great guy.

Favorite rapper is Wiz Khalifa, but I listen to a lot of music. I got a music symbol tattooed on my chest.

I just got one done -- my daughter's face tattooed on my right thigh.

It was great knowing all our hard work paid off in college. We wanted to make sure that once we get to the league that we leave a name for Clemson in the NFL because people used to say Clemson NFL players don't last long. But we wanted to come in with a different mindset and change that. And we've been doing a pretty good job at it so far.

I just started doing a lot of stuff in the community, like for Halloween I was passing out candy to kids and stuff. It's all about giving back and showing you care and you're a real person just like they are.

I watch all the old-school shows, like "Martin," "Fresh Prince." They're classics and still funny.

To be one of the dominant deep threats in the NFL, and one of the best receivers to ever play the game.